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new_homester
(mortal with potential)
05/20/05 08:34 AM
The impact of your first Bowie's album new  

To put it in a platonic style, Bowie is great to the extent, in which 'the Bowieish' shows in his works. But what is that entity?
My guess is that for each of us 'the Bowieish' has been determined by the first Bowie's album heard. For me, it was 'Heroes' a year after its release. Since then, I do regard (unconsciously) as more 'Bowie-esque' the albums and songs where I find traces of those Kraftwerk-like pulsations and quasi-recitals (Looking for Water, Shopping for Girls...) than his 'disco-king' productions like Let's Dance or even Young Americans. I know that it is taking a part for the whole, but that's how my perception works.
I remember that, in the early 80ies, my British friend asked me if I had heard any Bowie. I said 'Only Heroes'. - 'It's a shame!' -'Why?' - 'Well.. it's not very "Bowie"'.
But then, when I happened to hear 'Soul Love' (out of the album's context), it seemed so exotic to me... I even thought it was Joe Jackson ;)

So, will anyone share his/her first-Bowie experience?



Dara
(acolyte)
05/20/05 09:38 AM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: new_homester]  

My first Bowie album was Let's Dance. It didn't make a massive impact at first. In fact, I remember I bought The Police's "Synchronicity" the same day, and enjoyed that a lot more initially.

Synchronicity wore out fast though, and Let's Dance had more staying power. I remember being especially impressed by what became the singles (at this stage only the title track had been released), and Criminal World, and to a lesser extent Cat People. I was also intrigued by Ricochet. Only Shake it did nothing for me, and Without You not much (I was surprised when it later became the fourth US single).

Eventually, I liked the album enough to be encouraged to buy other Bowie albums, and it is these other early purchases that made the biggest impact on me. Hunky Dory was second, and Ziggy third.

Whereas I never bought another Police album (or Sting).

Slan leat,

Dara

"All those people that you killed,
All those lies that you told,
Have come back to haunt you,
And the best thing the Labour party can do now
Is to sack you."
George Galloway


new_homester
(mortal with potential)
05/20/05 10:48 AM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: Dara]  

Oh great! I enjoyed 'Synchronicity' about the same time. It took me going back to their first two albums to realise that this one was actually a decline of their era. But that's not to be said of the immortal 'Every Breath..' ;)



SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
05/20/05 11:39 AM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: new_homester]  

My first Bowie album was The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust (etc. etc.) and... that was five years ago (or actually four years and ten months). Today I don't actually think it's a very Bowie-ish album. Certainly, it has a lot of trademark Bowie stuff, but these days I consider his later stuff, especially "Heroes", to be the definitive Bowie. The charm of Ziggy wore off, unfortunately, as the years progressed.

Project Michelangelo | LiveJournal

icarusboy
(electric tomato)
05/20/05 11:57 AM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: Sysiyo]  

Good thread - more original than the 'What was your first Bowie Album' ones that pop up every now and again.

The first time Bowie really grabbed my attention was in 1993 when he released 'Jump They Say' as a single in the UK. Off the back of buying the single (with the great remixes) I went on to buy BTWN.

Your theory definately works in my case. 'Bowie-esque' for me means that similar sound to 'Jump They Say' The deep, groaning voice and the coolness of the accompanying video. I remember at the time thinking it was a little strange - seems so tame now I've heard everything else he's done.

I really loved that album (and still do to this day), but it inticed my into buying Changesbowie and then Ziggy Stardust....then pretty quickly into buying everything I could lay my hands on.


Before then, Bowie was the guy that sang Dancing In The Street with Mick Jagger when I was young - just a camp old rock aristcrat like Elton John or Rod Stewart - how wrong i was.

iccy

The Bowie Contingent
16th June 2005 @ The Grapes, Sheffield, UK
10th/11th June 2005 @ TW Meetup, London UK

LadyGravedigger
(cracked actor)
05/20/05 02:15 PM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: icarusboy]  

In reply to:

The first time Bowie really grabbed my attention was in 1993 when he released 'Jump They Say' as a single in the UK. Off the back of buying the single (with the great remixes) I went on to buy BTWN.


BTWN was my first Bowie-album too! And it was Jump They Say, that made me buy it.

In reply to:

'Bowie-esque' for me means that similar sound to 'Jump They Say' The deep, groaning voice and the coolness of the accompanying video. I remember at the time thinking it was a little strange


Now that I think of it, that must apply to me too. It was that voice and the coolness that I completely fell for then. But I also considered the album a bit strange. Probably because before that I'd only heard his most mainstream stuff like Let's Dance, which I'd liked too. But it really took some time to learn to appreciate that album.

Eventually it was Heathen that made me realize all his greatness. But on that, too, you can hear that deep incredible voice. So, even though Bowie's done so many so different albums and songs, the voice, and the coolness are, what define him for me.

Vanity is all

EJSundayModerator
(heroic dolphin)
05/20/05 04:35 PM
Way Back In The Days Of Old new [re: new_homester]  

Have you ever come across those stories about people who got their musical education by secretly listening nightly to Radio Luxemburg on AM radio while their parents thought they were sleeping? It is an old cliche but in fact I was one of those Radio Luxemburg kids. The UK top 40 twice a week, the US Top 30 and the album charts from both musical superpowers once a week, all done by English DJs, all going down when school kids should be sleeping - that was heaven for every music loving human being outside of those already Rock and Pop enhanced countries. I'll spare you all those nostalgic stories about the nasty sound quality and the feeling of subversity that was emotionally attached to all this.

It was exactly one night on Radio Luxemburg when I heard a song named "Space Oddity" which, as I learned, was a re-issue and was now back on its way up in the charts. That song did me in. Completely. I had heard and learned to love my first Bowie song ever, The Jean Genie, before - but this space song in the middle of the night with the radio by my bedside playing as low as possible to not attract the parents' attention was the hype. I couldn't wait for the next week to hear it again and to see if it managed to climb higher. Which it did well, as we know now.

From then on it was clear that I had to have this song, best the whole album. So I started to save up money but that was only half of the problem. In those days it was very hard to get hold of an album as little popular as "Space Oddity", especially in a fairly small town in Germany. But one day it was there, "Space Oddity", my first Bowie album. Of course this little ten year old was a little irritated when he heard the rest of the album which was a little harder to digest then the hit single - but I loved it. And I still do. I still have the magnificent poster that came with it (same pic as the cover) and the lyrics printed on the inner sleeve paved the way for the English language to have a hell of an impact on little EJ. You won't believe what it is like to hear "Cygnet Committee" and to simultaneously try to work out what sort of rebellion is going on there when you can only understand about 50 words of that language. But I heard that there was something going on an so I ploughed may way through the dictionary to get only a bit of what seemed to be so deadly important to me. I probably misunderstood 98% of what Bowie was going on about on that album but those 2% were enough to get me hooked. Hooked for life. And it was then when I started to grab my elder sister`s Pink Floyd albums, because they were well equipped with lyrics information, and began to produce written translations of English rock lyrics into German. Teenage German. Felt good.

Obviously "Space Oddity" is not a full top class Bowie album from an "objective" musical point of view - but here is one guy who loves this album to death for very different reasons.

And I want to believe
In the madness that calls 'now'


FastChanges
(kook)
05/20/05 05:26 PM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: new_homester]  

In reply to:

I even thought it was Joe Jackson


He'd certainly be flattered, for he is a fan. He is touring these days and he plays "Life on Mars" solo on piano from time to time. I have this on mp3 if anyone's interested.

The true Dadaists are against Dada.

Tinka
(mortal with potential)
05/20/05 05:30 PM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: new_homester]  

My first Bowie album was The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust the neighbors would play it all day long with windows open, I was five so in the summer I would sit on the front step of the house and listen,I have been a fan ever since



JarethsGirl
(cracked actor)
05/20/05 06:12 PM
Re: The impact of your first Bowie's album new [re: new_homester]  

My first Bowie album was Hunky Dory. At that time, I only knew a handful of his most popular songs and those from Labyrinth.

I just remember thinking how different it was from anything I'd been listening to, or anything I'd ever heard. Also, I'd never really been a true die hard fan of any artist before that point. Bowie was my first school girl type obsession.

I love the man's versitility, because each time I bought an album, it was like listening to a whole new artist (sorta). Each album was almost like the first Bowie experience, for me. Well, not every album.. but my favorites, at least.

It's holding the night in its arms
If only for a moment
I can't see the look in its eyes,
But I'm sure it must be laughing



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