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BowieTalk
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ziggfried
(acolyte)
06/14/10 06:15 PM
Bowie on the cover of the latest UNCUT [re: ]  



What is this, about the third time Uncut's done a retrospective on the Thin White Duke era? Oh well, "rare photos!" and "new interviews!" should probably make it worthwhile.



globule2
(cracked actor)
06/15/10 05:34 PM
Re: Bowie on the cover of the latest UNCUT new [re: ziggfried]  

a ressurection of "Ressurection..."?



still don't know why 84th street...

"apart from the cock, everything's all right" - DB

globule2
(cracked actor)
06/15/10 05:41 PM
Re: Bowie on the cover of the latest UNCUT new [re: globule2]  

Uncut editor:
[quote]Editor’s Letters
A couple of months back, we compiled a list of the 50 Greatest Lost Albums; in short, noteworthy records that are currently out of print. Astonished as we were by the list of artists whose back catalogues were incomplete – The Beatles, Beefheart, David Bowie, Van Morrison, Kraftwerk and more – our thoughts turned inevitably to what great films might not be currently available. And, for this month's 50 Greatest Lost Films feature, we were surprised all over again by the absence from catalogue of some truly amazing movies. Who'd have thought, for instance, that films by major directors and movie icons like Robert Altman, Dennis Hopper, Woody Allen, Jack Nicholson, Orson Welles, Frances Ford Coppola, Lindsay Anderson, John Sayles, Sam Fuller and, uh, Bob Dylan would all be out of print, never released on DVD or obtainable only second-hand on VHS?

Elsewhere this month, don't miss our cover story on David Bowie, which covers that part of The Dame's career when he reinvented himself as The Thin White Duke and out of the chaos of his life at the time produced Station To Station, one of the greatest albums of the '70s. On the next page, reader Andrew Richards nominates Morrissey's performance at Wolverhampton Civic Hall in December 1988 as his favourite ever gig. If asked to name the best show I've ever seen – or more probably held to the floor with a gun to my head and forced to make the choice – I'd probably have to say it was Bowie's Station To Station concerts at the Wembley Empire Pool in May 1976. I saw all six of them and would love to somehow revisit them to see if they were as good as I recall.

To which end, I was hoping that the new edition of the album that's due would include a live DVD of at least one of the performances, I wouldn't have cared where exactly it was filmed. Disappointingly, there won't be any such thing, although it turns out that the Wembley shows were filmed, by actor David Hemmings [globule2- the '78 London shows were filmed; not '76]. Bowie, however, was apparently so unhappy with the hard-drinking luvvie's evidently paltry effort that the footage is never likely to be seen. This leaves me only with what I can remember of them, which is all white light, feedback, and Bowie at his most imperious.

allan_jones@ipcmedia.com
[/unquote]

"apart from the cock, everything's all right" - DB

Marquis
(wise like orangutan)
06/15/10 06:53 PM
Hoodah Thunkit new [re: globule2]  

In reply to:

Who'd have thought, for instance, that films by major directors and movie icons like Robert Altman, Dennis Hopper, Woody Allen, Jack Nicholson, Orson Welles, Frances Ford Coppola, Lindsay Anderson, John Sayles, Sam Fuller and, uh, Bob Dylan would all be out of print, never released on DVD or obtainable only second-hand on VHS?


Anyone who cares enough about film to know who Sam Fuller is, I'm guessing.

We used to sell bootleg DVDs of Renaldo & Clara for some exorbitant sum. Probably shoulda copped one just to have it.

I don't walk it like I talk it cause I run it

emptysmellmetal
(wild eyed peoploid)
07/11/10 12:57 PM
Re: Bowie on the cover of the latest UNCUT new [re: ziggfried]  

Probably as good an overview of Station to Station
as you're gonna find anywhere....especially to the
uninitiated +

Only two things I didn't know :
Americana artist Norman Rockwell was asked to do
the cover for Young Americans, but needed at least
6 months to do it (a lifetime in Bowie's world).

Didn't know he was close buds with Deep Purple
bassist Glenn Hughes.

It's a wonder we all worshipped this rail thin, manic,
paranoid, insecure/egotistical genius. Curious how
much cocaine contributed to Bowie's "fearless"
leaps of genre hopping that most other musicians
(even on cocaine!) would never dare attempt !?








EuropeanCanon
(cracked actor)
07/15/10 02:35 PM
It's not the side effects of the cocaine new [re: emptysmellmetal]  

In reply to:

Curious how much cocaine contributed to Bowie's "fearless" leaps of genre hopping that most other musicians (even on cocaine!) would never dare attempt !?


Although cocaine (initially) increases confidence levels (as do a number of drugs) I don't believe it provided Bowie with the confidence, or the fearlessness, to change genres. Even though the period 1974-75 represented the peak of his cocaine intake, the startling artistic evolution of Bowie (from Diamond Dogs to Young Americans and through to Station To Station) would have remained the same had he not snorted prodigious amounts of coke up his hooter. As his preceding 'drug free' albums reveal, Bowie's interest and ability to change was entirely natural and inherent.

However, having said all that, I think it's documented somewhere that during that particular period Bowie felt sure that he wasn't able to write creatively without coke. It undoubtedly aided Bowie in that it boosted his energy levels, to the point where he was able to keep awake for days on end and able to work in the recording studio at ridiculously unsocial hours. And given that Station To Station was written and created in the studio, I suppose it’s conceivable that it would never have been recorded without the ol' Colombian marching powder. Purely hypothetical of course, but STS would surely have existed with the same cultural reference points in place although, without Bowie’s coke fuelled paranoia and emotional detachment, it’s likely Bowie’s Thin White Duke persona would have been a somewhat different animal.



God's footballer hears the voices of angels
Above the choir at Molineux.


Chinchilla
(kook)
07/18/10 06:14 PM
Re: It's not the side effects of the cocaine new [re: EuropeanCanon]  

Nice post EuropeanCanon. I tend to agree although there is one point that needs bringing up; apparently he got to a point during his worst levels of addiction where he wasn't able to write anything decent at all. He would get very depressed and lament to Glen Hughes and his wife that he couldn't produce anything. His wife tried to tell him it was the drugs.

Similar story was that Bowie himself recalls (miraculously) that he would spend hours writing and re-writing the same few lyirics or re-arranging the same few notes while making Station To Station; only to realise he'd come up with nothing and had been wasting his time. The drugs made him ocd about writing but didn't necessarily produce anything worthwhile. I'm guessing that he must've calmed down enough to get these gems out for the album though.

(Also Paul Buckmaster recalls him and Bowie trying to write music for the doomed TMWFTE soundtrack and saying that Bowie was so far gone on drugs he could barely stand and what they both ended up recording was a mess).




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