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ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/04/04 11:31 AM
Iggy, Bowie and Movies new [re: ziggfried]  

“When we practised for The Idiot tour, David, I, Hunt and Tony Sales and all the rest had an entire screening room in the old UFA studios where they made all the movie greats…You know, like Metropolis. Fritz Lang worked there before the Nazis took it over. Many great films were made at UFA. They still had all these wonderful German Expressionist films just sitting in cans rotting, because they still can’t figure out the politics of who should get them. You could smell the film slowly going bad.”

Iggy Pop, I Need More (1982)

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/04/04 11:34 AM
Bowie, Iggy and Drugs new [re: ziggfried]  

“Touring with Iggy’s band…That was very enjoyable for the most part. It was the first time I’d ever really put myself into a band since the Spiders. But with this I was an integral part of the band where I didn’t really do anything other than be a band member. It was great not having the pressure of being the singer up front. But there were too many drugs around at the time. I was trying to get away from those drugs and I was going through these really ambivalent things because I kept wanting to leave the tour to get off drugs. The drug use was unbelievable and I knew it was killing me, so that was a difficult side of it. But the playing was fun. Iggy would be preening himself before he went on and I’d be there reading a book.”

David Bowie, Q, May 1993

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/08/04 12:01 PM
Bowie, Iggy and Raw Power new [re: ziggfried]  

“But the most absurd situation I encountered when I was recording was the first time I worked with Iggy Pop. He wanted me to mix Raw Power, so he brought the 24-track tape in, and he put it up. He had the band on one track, lead guitar on another and him on a third. Out of 24 tracks there were just three tracks that were used. He said 'see what you can do with this'. I said, 'Jim, there's nothing to mix'. So we just pushed the vocal up and down a lot. On at least four or five songs that was the situation, including Search and Destroy. That's got such a peculiar sound because all we did was occasionally bring the lead guitar up and take it out."

David Bowie, International Musician, December 1991



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/20/04 12:08 PM
Davey & The Stooges new [re: ziggfried]  

“Very few people recognized the quality of the Stooges' songwriting, it was really meticulous. And to his credit, the only person I'd ever known of in print to notice it, among my peers of professional musicians, was Bowie. He noticed it right off, and he listed us as his favorites in some music poll. Somebody showed it to me and I said, 'Who the fuck is that? Never heard of him!'”

Iggy Pop, Raw Power liner notes, 1997

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/20/04 12:16 PM
Iggy, Danny, Davey & Tony new [re: ziggfried]  

"I realized The Stooges couldn't do anything more in Detroit, we'd gone as far as a Detroit band as we could, got as far as we'd gotten and disbanded. If we came back and reassembled something in Detroit and worked from that base, people wouldn't stay behind it. Because our momentum would've been diminished. I realized that I was gonna have to take this national or, if possible, international. That was where Tony DeFries came in. While I was in New York on Steve Paul's dime, sleeping on Danny Fields' banquette, this guy DeFries came to town with Bowie looking to co-opt the American avant-garde. I was an interesting candidate to join that circus to them.

Bowie knew about me and I think it was just a happy coincidence that I just happened to be in town, or a freak coincidence! I just happened to be in town, and Fields just happened to be stationed in his usual pit position at Max's Kansas City's backroom, where Bowie and his team were making the scene. Fields called me and said, 'Get down here, you can do yourself some good!' I said, 'Aw, I'm watching Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Jimmy Stewart is so sincere, I can't tear myself away,' I was practically in tears over Jimmy Stewart fighting these corrupt bastards and all that, so I didn't go down. So Fields called me about an hour and a half later, 'Get down here, goddamn it!' I said, 'When the movie's over!' So I waited til the movie was over and it was late but they were still down there.

We talked and I could tell right away that Bowie and DeFries were nutters. Steve was a carney, he'd started his career selling blackhead removing pencils through the back pages of Popular Mechanics, so he was still pretty much meat-and-potatoes, 'Let's get some fast bucks here,' a carney. But Bowie and DeFries were British music hall, pure vaudeville. I've always had a good sense of who's going somewhere and a good sense of circus, and I could just see there was a circus in town -- 'Join!' That was my immediate instinct. I thought this could be good for me right off.

David diplomatically suggested, 'Well, you know what we could do Iggy, what would be a great idea, there's a wonderful band in England, World War 3 with Edgar Broughton, have you heard of them? They're very heavy in England and they could be a wonderful backup band for you.' Bowie and DeFries had a very pop mentality the way they did things, 'You'll have a band, we could have this done in a half- hour!' Of course, guess who'd write the song -- not me!

But to give them their due, Bowie, DeFries, all the MainMan management people he later hired here, all these out-of-work actors -- these people had a real appreciation for the arts. It went very deep, and still does with Bowie. It's his great strength that he knows how to spot something that's not related to mainstream entertainment, bring it over to his camp where he can relate to it in some way, put his name on it and get involved, work with it and then send it out to a bigger public. It's what he does really well. But he couldn't do that well if he didn't really have an eye and an ear for this stuff. And DeFries is the same way. It's no accident he signed Bowie, then me, then later Mellencamp. When I'd talk to DeFries and tell him my ideals and my mad theories about life and theatre and music, he would listen. He had an affection for that and tried to respect it.

But Bowie knew my records and he was intelligent and friendly and decent and smart, and I could see it and I thought, 'This is pretty cool.' I could talk to this guy. And DeFries I thought was a character, I thought people will go for this guy, he had a big cigar and a big pointed nose and a great big Afro and a smug look on his face and an English accent and a big fur coat and a belly! And to the people who were running the American industry it just spelled 'Hot Manager!' He had an image and it would work, it would sell.”

Iggy Pop, Raw Power liner notes, 1997



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/20/04 12:21 PM
More Power new [re: ziggfried]  

“DeFries just out and out flat refused to put [Raw Power] out. He said, 'OK, we're gonna put it out, go away somewhere.' They shuffled me off to Los Angeles, where I didn't want to go, a real bad place to send me. They told me by phone later, 'We're not releasing it like that, David will remix it.' To which I said OK, because the other choice was I wasn't going to get my album out. I think DeFries told me that CBS refused to release it like that, I don't know. Who knows what the real story was? David and I and one of his bodyguards/gofers at the time, Stewie, went to Western Studios in Hollywood. To the best of my recollection it was done in a day. I don't think it was two days. On a very, very old board, I mean this board was old! An Elvis type of board, old-tech, low-tech, in a poorly lit, cheap old studio with very little time.

To David's credit, he listened with his ear to each thing and talked it out with me, I gave him what I thought it should have, he put that in its perspective, added some touches. He's always liked the most recent technology, so there was something called a Time Cube you could feed a signal into -- it looked like a bong, a big plastic tube with a couple of bends in it -- and when the sound came out the other end, it sort of shot at you like an echo effect. He used that on the guitar in 'Gimme Danger,' a beautiful guitar echo overload that's absolutely beautiful; and on the drums in 'Your Pretty Face Is Going To Hell.' His concept was, 'You're so primitive, your drummer should sound like he's beating a log!' It's not a bad job that he did. Somebody's since put out something on Bomp, Rough Power, which were some of my original mixes, but I think what David and I came up with at these sessions was better than that. So I think he helped the thing. I'm very proud of the eccentric, odd little record that came out.

In retrospect, I think the little touches Bowie put on the mix helped and I think some of the things MainMan did helped, and more than anything else, what the whole experience did was to get me out of Detroit and onto a world stage. And also I learned a helluva lot being over there in England and I started thinking differently. It led to a very ambitious piece of work, and that's fine. But the fact was that neither Bowie's mix nor my previous mix could do justice to the power of the band or even to the legibility of the vocal…I feel that now I have the wherewithall, the position, and the expertise at my disposal to give this thing its due sonically, and I didn't have that before. So it's kind of like I'm finishing that off. I don't think you can beat David's mix, it's very creative. But this is just a simple, straight band mix of a powerful band. I feel like there's a closure on it and that's a nice thing.”

Iggy Pop, Raw Power liner notes, 1997



ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 11:38 AM
Bowie on Iggy new [re: ziggfried]  

"I think maybe [Iggy and I] opened up some new avenues in what his approach could be to in terms of singing. I think he got into a whole new idea of melody lines and stuff, working with me. But on the other hand, I enjoyed working with him with his lyrics, the way he would work with lyrics. It's quite extraordinary. Still something I could never do. He works in a very different way to me."

David Bowie, 1993

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 11:48 AM
China Girl new [re: ziggfried]  

"[China Girl has an] extraordinary lyric, and it was really sort of thrown out as [Iggy] was writing it. It was literally thrown out on the recording session, almost verbatim. He changed maybe three or four lines. But it was an extraordinary talent that he has for spontaneous free thought."

David Bowie, 1993

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 11:57 AM
Bowie discusses their differences new [re: ziggfried]  

"We're very, very different from each other. He's a lot more exuberant than I am, I think. I tend to be quieter, more reflective. He's always kind of on the dangerous line as well. I'm much more of an observer, he's much more of a participant of things."

David Bowie, 1987

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 12:04 PM
Iggy discusses their differences new [re: ziggfried]  

"We're so opposite it works good...He's slick, I'm what I am...He's London, and I'm Detroit."

Iggy Pop, 1986


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