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ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/04/04 10:23 AM
The Tin Machine guy mentions Lou. new [re: ziggfried]  

"I think Lou writes in a much more detached manner from me. Lou's the kind of guy who sits back and watches what's going on and takes notes. He's very New York. I feel he could have been a feature writer of some kind if he wasn't a musician. He'd write these little essays and they'd go in New Yorker or maybe something a bit punchier like Bomb magazine. He's a natural journalist. He's almost become a kind of musical Woody Allen. The writer, the observer, the Samuel Pepys of New York."

David Bowie, Q, June 1989



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/04/04 10:25 AM
...and again. new [re: ziggfried]  

"I just think as [Lou]'s growing older he's becoming the writer that he was probably always going to become. A short story writer. He writes in the narrative form very clearly. For me there's still a lot of symbolism or instinctive or emotive lyric writing - I don't know where it comes from - that explains the way I feel or the atmosphere I'm in. There's a couple of lines in "Crack City" on this album - They'll bury you in velvet/And place you underground - which had intent. The drug dirge - and this is not a slight on Lou because Lou is clean - the sound that one associates with that particular lifestyle is very much personified by the early Velvets. I had hoped that I gave that away in those two lines."

David Bowie, Q, June 1989



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/09/05 10:53 AM
Bill and Dave and Lou. new [re: ziggfried]  

“Lou Reed is the most important writer in modern rock. Not because of the stuff he does, but the direction that he will take it. Half the new bands would not be around if it were not for Lou. The movement that Lou’s stuff has created is amazing. New York City is Lou Reed. Lou writes in the street-gut level and the English tend to intellectualize more.”

David Bowie (interviewed by William S. Burroughs), “Beat Godfather Meets Glitter Mainman,” Rolling Stone, 28 February 1974



shadowplay
(grinning soul)
04/11/05 12:01 PM
Simply put new [re: Atonalexpress]  

"Lou Reed, one of the greatest rock 'n' roll songwriters and singers of our time."

David Bowie, My World - Mirabelle Magazine, July 1973



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 01:16 PM
Re: Lou Reed new [re: Atonalexpress]  

“There are very, very few parallels between me and Lou Reed. I think I've only ever written one song like his, and that was "Queen Bitch," and it was only recognised as a Lou Reed song - and I know this for a fact - because I wrote next to it "For Lou".”

David Bowie, Melody Maker, February 1978



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 01:18 PM
Re: Lou Reed new [re: ziggfried]  

"...don't think my career was based on those two songs ["Queen Bitch" and "Andy Warhol"], and there is very little else that I have done that is anything near approaching what Lou Reed does or has done. I find it very hard to find a comparison between me and Lou.

I've never written about street people of such, or the gossip of the day, walked like him, dressed like him, looked like him or even performed like him. I think that's really shallow. We got on very well. I found him very witty, in a very New York way, And the same again, I might add, applies to young Iggy as well, 'cause I've also read that a coupla times.

But, you know - and I did it partly for the amusement factor - I've always noticed that if I put out certain names as my influences to see if people would pick up on them and then say I was definitely influenced by them, then every time I've done it it has always come back. Always, always, always!

I could say that my greatest influence, in fact, was Tiny Tim, and they'll say, "ah, of course! Quite obviously David Bowie has lifted an enormous amount from Tiny Tim." Always it works in that fashion.

I don't blame anybody because I do it purposely - I certainly used to do those red herrings just to see how it affected people - but it amused me that they would take something like that and convolute it and make it into a statement of their own."

David Bowie, Melody Maker, February 1978



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 01:21 PM
Re: Lou Reed new [re: ziggfried]  

"I haven't talked with Lou for a long time, so it's hard to know exactly what was at the back of his mind [when he made Metal Machine Music]. Of course, he promptly started producing very commercially-orientated albums after that, so I don't quite know whether that was a ploy to lever himself off RCA....And he went back to his basic theme, writing about that kind of netherworld. I don't think he's too interested in writing about anything else, though. I don't know - I think Lou stays in New York too much. Having said that, of course, I now, hear that he's staying in Japan, so it's not entirely true."

David Bowie, Melody Maker, February 1978



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/01/05 05:25 AM
Re: Lou Reed new [re: ziggfried]  

"...as I mentioned before, I'm something of a grasshopper, and I tend to flit from one thing to another. That's probably one of my biggest faults; that's something I've had to pull together. I've had to stop doing that sort of thing, because it's not fair to the artists concerned. In Lou's case it doesn't matter, because Lou's quite a survivor. But with the others…"

David Bowie, Circus, April 1976



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/13/05 02:06 PM
Re: Lou Reed new [re: ziggfried]  

“You know, David’s on my Raven album. I asked David if he would do this thing with me, he lives here...People don’t realise we’ve been friends for a very long time. I played him some of the songs and he picked “Hop Frog.” That’s the one he wanted to sing. Who knows why? I was happy he was gonna do anything. So he came and did it.

"I was very pleased, I like what David does. Specially when he’s doing background vocals and starts singing up high, I like that. I love what he did on Transformer, that’s why it came out that way.

"What Mick Ronson did, the strings for example were also pretty good for a little guy from Hull...He was a talented guy...Which was amazing cause you could not understand a word when he was talking. It was impossible. But David’s really good. It was fun to have him do these background vocals because it’s really got a sound to it when he sings them.”

Lou Reed, interviewed by Jerome Soligny for Rock&Folk, October 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
12/25/05 09:47 PM
Re: Lou Reed new [re: ziggfried]  

“I had been asked to play at one of the many early benefit concerts that were fast becoming the rage, this one for saving Wales (maybe it was whales). The importance of this show [the Royal Festival Hall, 8 July 1972], other than it being a classy venue, was that it gave me the perfect opportunity to introduce to the British public one of my major influences, Lou Reed.

Not that you’d believe it now, as many claim Lou Reed as their own, but Lou and the Velvets were virtually unknown outside of New York. They had a small cult following throughout the States but it would surprise me if there were more than a few thousand or so fans in all.

At least they were written about over there. In Britain, they didn’t exist. No one wrote about them, pictured them or made a noise about their music. If they did have fans on the press, then those fans were extremely reluctant to let their enthusiasm be known.

The same goes for Iggy and the Stooges. No one anywhere, but for those small pockets in the States, had taken any notice of these two great artists and, if there was one thing I was good at doing, it was being a proselytising rock fan and talking up my favourites. Tonight I was going to present one of them at this really high profile event. Since my earlier Ziggy and, more particularly, my Hunky Dory interviews where I had name checked Lou in regard to ‘Queen Bitch,’ I had seen a slight increase in coverage for him in the Brit press. All I needed now was a couple of Brit shows and a new album to get him a brand new listening public here and in Europe. We would start the new album, Transformer, in August after the festival show.

Therefore, for me this encore segment of the show was the highest of thrills. Lou had gone shopping for an extraordinary and what looked to me to be a glam-ish Mexican number, in black and silver. As another gesture to this glam thing he had also put on lots of eye make-up over a white skin base. Very fetching and a little ominous. Just right, of course. We had a ball, playing and singing together, racing full tilt through ‘White Light/White Heat,’ ‘Sweet Jane’ and the essential ‘Waiting For The Man.’

David Bowie, Moonage Daydream (2002), p. 58 (2005 ed).




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