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AdamAdministrator
(acolyte)
04/06/04 10:06 AM
Momus new  

'The Man Who Sold The World', 'Hunky Dory' and 'Space Oddity'. I loved the way that those LPs could put gentle ballads next to incredibly loud and sinsiter outbursts. It's that kind of feel I've aimed at in what I do."

Nick Currie, The Beat magazine, December 1995, Interview by Paul Mathur

AdamAdministrator
(acolyte)
04/06/04 10:37 AM
Re: Momus new [re: Adam]  

Bowie was one of my greatest teachers of the value of fakeness, and I have no problem with people gatecrashing whatever genres they want.

Nick Currie, Terror Tales Online Interview by Quentin S Crisp

AdamAdministrator
(acolyte)
04/06/04 10:48 AM
Re: Momus new [re: Adam]  

(On his Folktronic album)

Having being a fan of David Bowie who was the chameleon rock star of the 1970s. He stole people's styles and made them his own. Bowie mixed Jacques Brel with Philly Soul or whatever. I came to America and thought "That's the essence of America really." It's that capacity of Americans to reinvent themselves and make that fakeness or plasticity a virtue.

Nick Currie, Interview by Alexander Laurence, August 2002, Volume 2

AdamAdministrator
(acolyte)
04/06/04 10:52 AM
Re: Momus [re: Adam]  

I guess my main influence has always been David Bowie, strangely enough. He's been very good at telling stories, but he's also, with his appropriation of the Brion Gysin and William Burroughs cut-up technique, been guilty of launching a respectability for the kind of surreal, atmospheric, rather meaningless rock lyrics that you get a lot of the time now in modern rock.

Nick Currie, The Onion, Interview September 9, 1999 Volume 35 Issue 32

AdamAdministrator
(cricket menace)
07/24/05 09:37 AM
Kabuki new [re: Adam]  

My big star when I was a kid was David Bowie and he was almost like a dancer. He was very physical, using kabuki movements and all the rest of it. Now Iíve developed my own very clumsy choreography, with gestures imitating a Japanese girl and then Iím Robin Hood or something else coming directly from the lyrics of the song. Often I just feel like acting out the songs that Iím singing.

Momus, A Scottish Post Protestant Radical In Berlin, An Interview with Nicholas Currie, Berlin, December 18 2004, www.tangents.co.uk


AdamAdministrator
(cricket menace)
07/24/05 09:39 AM
Berlin new [re: Adam]  

[Otto Spooky is] my first proper Berlin recorded record ..... and I think of it as something like David Bowieís Lodger. It has a restless way of exploring the styles of different cultures and I got interested in disorientation as a theme for an album. So it jumps about a lot and has a different style on each track.

I had always thought about Berlin, ever since David Bowie had lived here in the late 70s. Berlin seemed glamorous and I had been here before in 1987 with Primal Scream. Berlin is a place that has a liberty of mind. It seems almost a post Protestant city where everyone is challenging authority.

Momus, A Scottish Post Protestant Radical In Berlin, An Interview with Nicholas Currie, Berlin, December 18 2004, www.tangents.co.uk

AdamAdministrator
(cricket menace)
07/24/05 09:49 AM
Bowie The Total Fucking Genius! new [re: Adam]  

He's touched heights few other artists have. He's an extremely bright man and attractive man with a quite extraordinary voice. His chord sequences are actually very original and haunting, his backing vocal arrangements incredibly good, his production skills patchy ("Raw Power") but often amazing ("Transformer", "Diamond Dogs"). He's perhaps one of a handful of truly postmodern artists to have worked in the late 20th century. A lot of his work is touched with undeniable genius: look at the sweeping, symphonic structure of "Sweet Thing / Candidate", the oddness of "Andy Warhol" or "DJ", the odd structures of "Joe The Lion" or "Breaking Glass". He's exerted extraordinary Pied Piperlike charismatic power over so many other artists that he's become a whole genre, really, but his work in the 60s and 70s always went way beyond the genres he played around with. I mean, "Young Americans" is a pretty odd soul album, isn't it? A soul concept album about a black presidential campaign? Listen to the way Bowie coke-provises the lyrics and almost scat-sings his way through the title track. Look at him perform it as the first white artist on Soul Train, looking absolutely amazing, the ultimate whiteblackschizococainedandy! Total fucking genius!

Momus (nic...), July 11th, 2005, C/D : David Bowie "Chilly Down (with the Wild Gang)", ilXor.com

AdamAdministrator
(cricket menace)
07/24/05 09:53 AM
Ziggy Stardust new [re: Adam]  

Carrot and Stick - Its the early 70's. I've been sent to boarding school in Scotland while the rest of my family are living in Greece. I'm miserable there. Life seems very grey: low clouds, uniforms, rugby and algebra. Since I'm considered responsible (I cry a lot and carry a copy of "The Wasteland" in my pocket) I'm given the right to use the Senior Common Room, a tiny room at the top of the building which boasts a couple of chess sets, a few Kipling novels and a mono record player. Mark Hughes a Brandonseque boy from the A stream, has a sister who's a Bowie fan, so he has all the albums. The new one has a weird Brechtian title: "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and The Spiders From Mars". It's bleaker than the rest, bleaker even than "All The Madmen" off "The Man Who Sold The World"

Day after day they take some brain away
Then turn my face around to the far side of town
...Tell me that its real then ask me how I feel

Stuck in this grim institution where they beat you for talking out of turn, that clicks. To tease me, Hughes keeps singing that line "So where were the Spiders/When the fly tried to break our balls?". I can't believe they've got the balls to play it on the Radio 1. Bowie's voice is like nothing I've ever heard: high, metallic, alien, apprehensive. My nickname is Groovy, but soon they're calling me Poof. I just smile, because I'm having an affair with an oriental boy. We swing on ropes over the Water of Leith and kiss a bit. We speculate on whether Lou Reed and Mickey Finn from T.Rex are like us. We know that Bowie "swings both ways". Its just all in the air. Even the boys who call us poofs are jerking each other off in the dorms at night, pretending its a demonstration of what they get up to with their girlfriends back home in Africa in the holidays. I get expelled from the Senior Common Room when the housemaster catches me hiding in the music rooms, skipping tea to listen to "Drive in Saturday" on my transistor. Apparently I'm not so responsible after all. The rarefied privileges of the Senior Common Room have corrupted me. My education has indeed gone very wrong: something I passed upon stair has undone a decade of brutal socialisation backed with the ash. The carrot-haired Ziggy wins over the stick. Instead of setting into chartered accountancy I become a singer.

Momus, Institute of Contemporary Art's "A Rock N Roll Suicide" Concert Programme


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