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ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:34 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“There's probably a few reasons why [Bowie had nothing to do with Mick Ronson's testimonial gigs], but you'd have to ask him.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #61 - February 17, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:35 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“The original lyric [in “All The Young Dudes”] was, 'Marks + Sparks'. David changed it to 'unlocked cars' as it was his call. The Beeb didn't like Marks 'n' Sparks (free advertising).”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #63, Part 1 - April 17, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:38 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Caleb Miles often thought “Boy” was written about David Bowie and how many times have I heard this before! Sorry to disappoint, but it wasn't. His manager might have got a couple of references though!”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #63, Part 1 - April 17, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:39 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David wrote [“All The Young Dudes”] so he gets the publishing. We recorded it so we get a royalty from the record company.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #64, Part 2 - May 18, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/28/06 10:33 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"David probably demoed the vocal [of "Dudes"] and then I probably worked on my interpretation of it afterward. As far as I can recall, the harmonies were Buff [Dale Griffin], David, Mick [Ralphs] and Stan [Tippins] - but I can't be sure. Am I the first Brit rapper? Who knows?"

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #69, Part 1 - 13 November, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/20/07 02:59 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Lou came down [to the All The Young Dudes sessions]. I've got Lou singing ["Sweet Jane"] at the moment. I've got to put Ian on, but he doesn't know the lyrics yet...Lou phrased it so Ian can pick up how it was...It's really good...The album is fabulous. They've never written better stuff. They were so down when I first met them...everything was wrong. Everything was terrible, and because they were so down I thought I was gonna have to contribute a lot of material. Now, they in a wave of optimism and they've written everything on the album bar one Lou Reed number and the "Dudes" single I did for them. They were being led into so many directions, because of general apathy with their management and recording company. Everybody was very excited about them when they first came out and then, because they didn't click immediately, it fell away. When I first saw them and that wasn't very long ago, I couldn't believe that a band so full of integrity and a really naïve exuberance could command such enormous following and not be talked about. The reactions at their concerts were superb, and it's sad that nothing was done about them. They were breaking up, I mean, they broke up for three days and I caught them just in time and put them together again 'cause in fact all the kids love them."

David Bowie, NME, 22 July 1972



ziggfried
(acolyte)
06/18/07 10:27 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“If it hadn’t been for Guy [Stevens, Mott’s first manager/producer]…I mean, we did four stiff albums for Island Records, nowadays that’s unheard of, y’know, pretty much unheard of then. Guy kept that going, and then David gave us “All The Young Dudes”, which was the real big leg-up, y’know, and then Tony [DeFries] was…I dunno so much Tony, Tony wasn’t really that keen on us. It was David that was keen on us, and so Tony did what David wanted, y’know?…He hated me talking on stage, ’cause he wanted to give that Bowie kind of…He said, ‘Every time you open your mouth, it drives me crazy. I wish you would not do this…’ A joke…I’m not David, d’you know what I mean? I’m Ian!”

Ian Hunter, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/08 10:49 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“We did split up in 1972, in Switzerland. We were right at the bottom of the ladder playing in a converted gas tank and we didn’t see the point anymore. Coming back from Switzerland, we were all great mates again because the pressure was off. Pete Watts went to audition for Bowie and David’s like: “What are you doing here? Looking for a gig? You can’t do that, you’re Mott the Hoople, you’re great!”

“I’d never met Bowie: I’d seen him once doing his performance art thing, in about 1965. I knew he was great, but I didn’t like what he was doing. But the women lined up after his show – it was obvious the guy had something.

“Bowie offered us “Suffragette City” first, which I liked but I knew it wouldn’t get on radio. Radio was closest to us, so I knew we needed something special. I thought it would be something like “You Really Got Me” (Mott had previously covered the Kinks classic). But when he played “…Dudes,” I could see how could go to town and really do a number on it. I’m a peculiar singer but I knew I could nail it.

“I wondered why he was giving it to us. [Mick] Ronson told me later that he’d done it himself and he wasn’t too happy with it. At the time, he told us that he’d written it specially for us, but that turned out not to be the case.

“David was saying, it’s a bit boring at the end, it needs something else. We’d done a gig at The Rainbow [Finsbury Park, London] the night before and I emptied a bottle of beer over a heckler and did the rap that I put on the end of the song.

“Now when Bowie does it he puts the rap on, I don’t do it anymore. The song made us instant gays: we were tranny magnets when we played in the US. Touring with Bette Midler probably helped add to that reputation. At first I was scared to go into gay clubs but it was fabulous, people loved us there, we had some great hilarious times.

“A lot of the fans didn’t like it when we had the hit – it was like their secret was out of the bag. The thing in the press that we couldn’t do it [have hits] without Bowie. We hadn’t anticipated that. We learned a lot from Bowie, but I knew after that we had to write and we worked our asses off. We knew there was a backlash from “…Dudes,” we kind of jumped on the glam bandwagon, too, dressing up and all that. Some of the old fans and even some of the band didn’t like it, but it was something we had to do.

“Later, when I wrote “Hymn for the Dudes,” it was a way of saying ‘it’s going to be all right.’ Though, of course, it wasn’t.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #128, January 2008, p.36



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/08 10:50 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Coming back from Switzerland there was talk of splitting up but I couldn’t see it happening. OK, we didn’t have a hit, but we were still going doing great live. Island [Records] had arranged the rock ‘n’ roll circus [a variety package similar to the Rolling Stones’ 1969 TV special] with a knife thrower, performing dogs and Max Wall. When we told Chris Blackwell we were going to pack it in, he said, “If you do, I’ll see to it that none of you work again.” I was bloody happy he said that – I didn’t want to pack up. Why pack up after struggling so hard? The ironic thing is that when we had the hit with “…Dudes,” I went and left, like an idiot. I could kick myself in the arse now.

“Bowie was a little nervous when he played the song. We were all crowded around him in a circle. We went on tour and he sent us flowers and congratulatory telegrams to our dressing room, telling us the studio was booked.

“At the recording he held back; it was a different approach to working with Guy [Stevens] – he wanted it basic and commercial. Later when Bowie tried to do the same thing on the album, things went a bit iffy. There was a buzz around when we were recording it – Mickie Most turned up to see what was happening. You knew something was happening when hit makers started sniffing around.

At first, when Bowie mixed it, the organ was extremely low. There was a bloke sat in the corner, I never knew his name but he was obviously a top guy at CBS. He could see I wasn’t very happy and he came over and said, “I think you’d better mix it again, Dave.” He rebooked the studio the next day with the instruction: “Organ track up!” I thought: what a great bloke. He was very important to the record.

“Doing Top of the Pops wasn’t very good for me. I had my Hammond with a bloody swastika on the back. I was a bit naïve then, it was something I brought in to Chris Farlowe’s shop and it fitted a hole that had been blown at the back of the organ. There were a lot of Jewish people at the studio: nobody said anything, but they just pushed the organ to the side of the stage.

“The girl at CBS was phoning us up everyday with sales figures – in the end it was like: “Do us a favour, love, and let us get some sleep.” We weren’t really that excited because the song had come from someone else, not from the group.

“The gay society of LA welcomed us with bouquets. Our roadies Lee and Zee were ultra gay – they picked up blokes wherever we played. The Mott sound changed after I left – brass, backing singers and it became Ian’s band, they had more hits but never got higher than “All the Young Dudes.””

Verden Allen, Uncut #128, January 2008, p.38



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/08 10:51 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“When we went to Zurich it was like the Dawn of the Dead, bloody awful. But it was just the latest in a long line of break ups – we always came back from the brink. Pete Watts was a fan of both Bowie and Mick Ronson and they began communicating with each other. Bowie was a breath of fresh air in the studio – he knew exactly what he wanted, but he was also very easy going, great with people. Everything he did worked, and worked very well. He really understood musicians.

“We used to sit in the studio watching him, it was fascinating because the recording we’d done before then was with Guy Stevens, and he was heading in a dangerous direction, breaking and smashing things. Mott were one of the things he was going to smash. He was having mental problems, very sad.

“The weird thing is, “…Dudes” ruined Mott the Hoople. We had a massive fanbase and as soon as they heard “…Dudes,” all those fans went away. It completely buggered us for a while. Having a hit record was a tremendous boost for us – we went from losers to being a band that was going somewhere.

“It affected Ian. He was doing slightly cod Bob Dylan things that we’d been getting away with for some time, and one of Bowie’s suggestions was that he didn’t do that any more. In America we stayed at the Riot House but we didn’t party like Zeppelin – Lee and Zee would have killed us if we had. Those two were really fantastic people from Bowie’s crowd, really great fun.

“It was very difficult for four members who wanted to get songs in. But really only Ian was writing them. I think Ian ended up wanting to get some people out of the band. I think he’d have liked to have got me out because he never wanted me in, he thought I was shit. Also, he forced Ronno [Mick Ronson] on us. He wouldn’t speak to us which caused a lot of bad feeling. You couldn’t continue a band that way, it had to end.”

Dale Griffin, Uncut #128, January 2008, p.38




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