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Emil
(stardust savant)
04/03/04 03:08 PM
Gary Numan new  

I looked to Ultravox, in those days, as being the standard to aim for. Kraftwerk, of course, and Neu! had been around for some time before that. I think the Bowie albums brought Eno's idea of electronic music to a wider audience. I've always been led to believe that Eno was the creative force behind the electronic element of those two Bowie albums. Good albums, though.

Uncut April 2001, p. 65

Ruskie
(stardust savant)
04/05/04 11:01 PM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Emil]  

I only have opinions on them because I've been asked about them; I never had any before. I've already been asked once about Numan over the last month.

Numan? I really don't know. I think what he did - that element of 'Saviour Machine' - type things - I think he encapsulated that whole feeling excellently. He really did a good job on that kind of stereotype, but I think therein lies his own particular confinement. I don't know where he intends going or what he intends doing, but I think he has confined himself terrifically. But that's his problem, isn't it?

David Bowie, NME, September 1980

EuropeanCanon
(crash course raver)
04/06/04 03:43 PM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Emil]  

How much of an influence was Bowie's 'Berlin period' on your work?

That was about the last time I liked Bowie, actually, that particular period. I thought he did some great stuff. And it was after that, he kind of lost it .... to me anyway. I wouldn't dare to criticise him. But musically he did not influence me, not really. When I got into electronics, the only electronic thing he had done really was the B-side of Low. It was almost classical, very long doomy pieces. At the time I was trying to write three-minute pop songs, so I looked more towards Ultravox, a little bit of Kraftwerk and Daniel Miller.

Record Collector, March 2001, No. 259 (p. 23)

schizophrenic
(crash course raver)
07/05/04 11:37 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Emil]  

"For about a year I tried to look like Bowie, but it never happened for me, unfortunately. For a very short period I had the Thin White Duke look. I used to wear the waistcoat and I had the blond bit at the front of my hair."

BowieStyle by Mark Paytress, page 114



SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
07/06/04 05:59 AM
The Heart's Filthy Lesson new [re: EuropeanCanon]  

I thought it was brilliant. There's so much crap, then there's something like that which comes along, which is an absolute masterpiece and only gets to number 35. On "The Heart's Filthy Lesson" every sound is a gem. The arrangement was brilliant and he sang it well. My own feelings are, much as I think his voice is phenomenal, he oversings a lot of the time. He sings harder than he needs to to; that's why I prefer his earlier stuff. "Heart's Filthy Lesson" was right back into that not-so-full-on singing. That's what I hate about Whitney Houston. I know she can sing very well but, fuck me, you don't have to sing flat out in every song you do. Too much singing going on here! "Heart's Filthy Lesson" was right to the point. It was right where it needed to be, a very focused track, right up my street, right in the middle of the sort of music I love.

David Buckley: Strange Fascination (2001 edition), page 511

EJSundayModerator
(acolyte)
11/28/04 08:39 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Emil]  

Q: Do you think Beggars Banquet saw a little Bowie in you and label mate Peter Murphy?

A: I doubt that Beggars saw a little bit of Bowie in me. I was a little spotty punk rocker when they signed me. The electronic music and strong image was still to come. Martin Mills (who owns Beggars Banquet) has said that he saw a stage presence in me that was commanding and unique from the very beginning and that was one of the reasons why he signed me. The thing I learned from Bowie was all to do with presentation and that wasn't able to surface until the records began to sell and I got the opportunity to do TV. That was sometime after I was signed up by Beggars so I tend to think that they saw something else in me rather than a little bit of Bowie. To be honest I couldn't care less what it was, I was just glad to be signed by a label.

Gary Numan, electronicmusic.com, November 1997

SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
02/02/05 09:04 AM
Cloning new [re: EJSunday]  

"I've seen some of his videos. To be honest, I never meant for cloning to be a part of the eighties. He's not only copied me, he's clever and he's got all my influences too. I guess it's the best of luck to him."

Bowie on Numan,
interview by Paula Yates on Record Mirror 1979,
reproduced in Strange Fascination by David Buckley


SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
02/02/05 09:29 AM
The Fury new [re: Sysiyo]  

I lost my whole thing for Bowie within five second of reading what he had said. The man had been, outside of my family, the biggest thing in my life. I'd had fights over him, I'd got beaten up because of him. If there was a Bowie influence running through my songs, it wasn't intentional, although I would be stupid to deny it because he was such a big part of my life.To have some who you hold in such high reagard say something so dismissive and so petty about somebody else's life I thought was pathetic, really. I understand it much more now because I'm 40 years old and I've had my ups and downs and I can understand much more of what was going on in his mind. That would have been about seven or eight years into his fame. If I'd gone back to when I was seven or eight years into mine, I guess that I might have mad similar problems if someone had come along in the mid-1980's who had a really big electronic hit. It didn't actually happen, but if it had, I might have felt a bit bitter about it, and I might have said something a bit scathing in an interview.

Gary Numan,
interview by David Buckley in Strange Fascination


SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
02/02/05 09:45 AM
The Kenny Everett Show new [re: Sysiyo]  

I'd done my bit, then Mallet said, "Bowie's going to be here next week. Do you want to come and see him?" Can you imagine? You'd just got famous yourself and all that was brilliant in your life and the next thing you're actually going to meet David Bowie! Shortof flying to the mood and back I couldn't imagine anything else I would have rather done. So, I go along and there are a few other famour people there like bob Geldof and Paula Yates, and I am shy. There's a little side room and we are allowed to look through a doorway and bugger me if Bowie didn't see me! I am sitting in the back of this room, trying to keep out of the way, and totally in awe. So recording stops and it's all awkward for a bit and nobody's sure what is going on. Obviously, something's happened because Bowie's not happy. Mallet comes over to me and says, "Can I have a word?" So he takes me outside and says, "David Bowie spotted you. He's not very happy about it and doesn't want you in the building." And that was it! So I'm thrown out! If Bowie had said, "Look, Mallet, I want that bloke off," then you were off because Mallet had a huge financial incentive to want to stay doing Bowie's videos. the next thing I know is that about three or four days later we get a call saying unfortunately it's not possible to have your song on The Kenny Everett Show, it doesn't fit in schedule, or some other fuckin' stupid excuse. So that was it! Out of the building and off the programme!

Gary Numan,
interview by David Buckley on Strange Fascination


ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/12/05 11:07 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Emil]  

"When I first got into electronic music, I used to listen to Ultravox a lot. They were the only people really who were doing things where they mixed synthesizers - electronics - with conventional instruments, and that's what I wanted to do. I didn't want to replace old instruments the way people like Kraftwerk had done - with just all electronic. That kind of didn't work for me. The things that Bowie and Eno were doing were kind of not really what I was after either, but Ultravox were. Ultravox were very much in the same sort of vein. So, I listened to them quite a lot. Before that, I really wanted to be a pop star/rock star because of people like T Rex and Marc Bolan and so on. I was a Bowie fan for a while, but not for that long."

Gary Numan, Music Street Journal, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/12/05 11:07 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Emil]  

"I’d been a Bowie fan before punk and used to get no end of trouble. I was always getting knocked about and having to run up the street, getting chased by people. It was horrible.”

Gary Numan, hkclubbing.com, 9 May 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/12/05 11:10 AM
Re: The Kenny Everett Show new [re: Sysiyo]  

"The amount of kicks in the bollocks I took for [Bowie]! The last thing he said was `Whatever has gone on between us can't take away from the fact that Gary Numan has given us two of the finest moments in English pop history."...20 years too late. To be honest, I don't care about him. I don't particularly like his music; he hasn't done anything in the last 20 years that's been relevant to me. I understand why he did it (had Numan removed from The Kenny Everett Show in 1979). I was outselling him four to one, and he must have been surrounded by people constantly telling him his career's in decline. That must have created insecurity."

Gary Numan, Student Direct, 7 July 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/12/05 11:11 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"Aladdin Sane was the first Bowie album I was aware of, and the whole image is amazing. It had the best cover of any album I'd ever seen with the lightning flashes on his face, an ancestry that can be seen in artwork today--you know, Marilyn Manson. It was the peak of that whole glam rock/androgynous/weird-sex period with songs like, "Panic In Detroit" and "Cracked Actor".

Gary Numan, amazon.co.uk



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/12/05 11:13 AM
Bowie at Wembley, 1976 new [re: Emil]  

"I dyed my hair orange with gold sprayed in the front and wore a waistcoat with Gitaines cigaretts in my pocket, even though I didn't smoke. I don't think I looked very cool. When I managed to get to the front, I was holding one of those glowing green sticks that you used to get at gigs. I lobbed it at Bowie during The Jean Genie and caught him in the chest - probably the greatest moment of my life at that point."

Gary Numan, Mojo, Winter 2000



SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
07/13/05 08:37 AM
On the Nazi salute new [re: ziggfried]  

I didn't actually see him because there were too many people. But Bowie had just come back from Germany and I'm sure the press was looking for something. You're standing up at the back of the car and you're waving at this massive crowd that's some distance away. Think about it. If a photographer takes a whole motor-driven film of someone doing a wave, you will get a nazi salute and the end of each arm-sweep. All you need is some dickhead at some music paper or whatever to try to make an issue out of it and it looks bad. But I'd be amazed if he'd done a nazi salute. When I was there I didn't see anyone, there were thousands of people there, and I didn't see anyone walking around saying, "What a wanker, he did a nazi salute". No one. People just thought he was waving at them, and I'm sure he was.

Gary Numan, Strange Fascination, 2001 edition.

SysiyoModerator
(thunder ocean)
07/13/05 08:52 AM
Bowie at Wembley, 1976, part 2 new [re: ziggfried]  

I threw my little luminous green stick at him and it hit him during "The Jean Genie". He bent over and picked it up. I thought I was going to wet myself! Up to that point, it was the greatest moment of my life. It completely blew me away, and I nearly got beaten up at the end because one of the crew gave it to somebody else and I just lost it and started screaming and shouting him. I couldn't believe it. The man had touched it and they gave it to somebody else!

Gary Numan, Strange Fascination, 2001 edition.

ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/31/05 09:32 PM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: Ruskie]  

"What Numan did he did excellently but in repetition, in the same information coming over again and again, once you've heard one piece...It's rather sterile vision of a kleen-machine future again. But that's really so narrow. It's that false idea of hi-tech society and all that which is...doesn't exist. I don't think we're anywhere near that sort of society. It's a enormous myth that's been perpetuated unfortunately, I guess, by readings of what I've done in that rock area at least, and in the consumer area television has an awful lot to answer for with its fabrication of the computer-world myth."

David Bowie, NME, September 1980



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/05 05:49 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"I think the British scene has lost all its mystery. British music has always been interesting because eccentric characters have always been part of Britain. The Beatles, Stones, Marc Bolan, Bowie and then everyone in the punk scene, they were all interesting, slightly disturbing people. We British are definitely odd, and I think that is why the best people on stage are British."

Gary Numan, 1983 (cited in the liner notes of the 2002 edition of Warriors)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
01/16/06 09:38 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“What happened to me was, I made it on my second album, and I’d never been on a big concert tour supporting anybody, I really hadn’t even headlined any clubs or anything like that, so I went from being absolutely nothing, rock bottom, to about as big as you can get, in this country anyway, and it was very much…it was very difficult, really. You’re put in the same class as people like obviously Bowie and Bryan Ferry and all the others of that class, standard, which is nice in one respect, but very difficult in another, ’cause they’ve been doing it for ten, fifteen years, and you’ve been doing it for about ten or fifteen days, and so it’s…obviously I had a lot to learn.”

Gary Numan, Berserker concert, 11 December 1984



ziggfried
(acolyte)
01/20/06 10:54 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"Before [the Kenny Everett incident] I thought he was a god...I used to get into fights at school protecting his name. Then, all of a sudden, this bloke I'd adored for years was throwing me out of a building because he hated me so much. It really upset me at the time, especially when I thought of how many thumps I'd taken for him. I can only imagine he was going through an insecure patch. At the time I was outselling him about four to one."

Gary Numan, 27 January 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/02/06 08:49 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"I was a massive T-Rex fan for most of my young life and then I got into David Bowie after that, but I didn’t get into him until after he finished the whole Ziggy Stardust thing so I kind of missed out on the best bit."

Gary Numan, Barcode, February 2006




ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/05/06 08:14 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"As Alice Cooper and David Bowie are both old enough to be my dad - no offence - I don't think I have much in common with either of them. Marilyn Manson said to me that he thought his Mechanical Animals album had a bit of Numan and a bit of Bowie - which I was quite proud of but I found it easier to spot the Bowie influence rather than mine."

Gary Numan, The Sun Online webchat, 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 03:35 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“It was Bowie who got me into [William S.] Burroughs. There was so much talk about him that I read him to see what all the fuss was about. And it was good. I could see why Bowie relies on him a lot…well, I don’t know, maybe he doesn’t. I think Bowie relies on him for actual technique, whereas I rely on him more for words and structures.”

Gary Numan, Melody Maker, 9 June 1979



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 03:52 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“Nearly every song I’ve ever written has been written after I’ve heard another song. When I was 16 I wrote a series of songs all based on Ziggy Stardust. I was influenced a lot by Bowie and although I can’t remember the titles, every one was a rip-off from the tracks on the Ziggy Stardust LP. All the names were changed but apart from that they were the same. I still do that now but I disguise them much more. Most people think I’ve been influenced by Bowie, but most of the things that people pick up on are completely wrong anyway. I don’t like Bowie’s lyrics very much these days. I don’t think he writes very good lyrics anymore.”

Gary Numan, In The City, 1979



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 03:54 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“It was mostly image really [that I liked about Ziggy Stardust], totally in fact…Obviously I liked the music as well but that wasn’t what really influenced me. It was Bowie as a person, as a character, his whole image. I wish he’d carried it on.”

Gary Numan, In The City, 1979



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 03:59 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“…I used to be involved in [punk rock], jumping up and down and pogoing. I saw the Pistols and all that a lot, I used to go to all the pubs that they all went to before it really started. I used to go around with dyed hair, going to the Vortex on David Bowie nights and it was all fun for a while and then it got very boring. The bands didn’t get any better as far as I was concerned. Shortly after punk started, Bowie came over for his ’76 tour and then I realised what it was really about. And then all of a sudden the bubblegum lot started coming out again, and that were terrible – there was no power!”

Gary Numan, In The City, 1979



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 04:03 AM
Re: Gary Numan [re: ziggfried]  

“I go through different phases of liking different people. At the moment I’m into Eno and before that I was into Kraftwerk, then, of course, I’ve been into Ultravox, now and again. Then, of course, there’s David Bowie, who I’m into most of the time.”

Gary Numan, In The City, 1979



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 04:37 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“The reason we said we was going to do it [appear on The Kenny Everett Video Show, 1979] was because we were asked by Thames Television to do it, and they said it would be for the New Year’s Eve show.

“We then went and filmed it and spent a whole day on it. I was dancing for about eight hours without a break filming the bloody thing, and there were promises all round that I could go and help with the editing.

“It was definitely going to be on the New Year’s show because it was ‘Looking into the 80s’ and there was going to be people from the 70s like Bowie. And as if it was going to be New Year’s Eve, it was going to show what was happening in the 80s, that sort of thing. That was going to be us, that was our part in it.

“I went down to watch Bowie do his bit after we’d done ours, and I got thrown out. I was told by the director that Bowie didn’t want me there, which was fair enough, I suppose.

“[It was] me to start with and then apparently he was upset by it and then everyone had to go. Later on he stormed off and wouldn’t do a sketch with Kenny Everett. The next thing we heard was, we were not being used at all.

“Then we were told that what we did and what Bowie did was not working well together. That was rubbish because I saw what Bowie did, because I was there, and they are nothing like each other at all. There is no way that they could not have gone on together.

“They said that they wanted us to do the show in the first place because it would have been good to have a confrontation between David Bowie and me on the very last programme of the year, just to compare if nothing else.

“And I was all for that, because it would’ve cleared the air once and for all, and hopefully people would have realised, seeing us side by side, that we are really nothing alike at all. The way Bowie moves and songs and his music, is nothing like the way I move and sing my music!

“Now the fact that he wore a black leather jumpsuit – and I wouldn’t dare say that he was copying me by wearing black – I wouldn’t dare say that!

“Anyway, to go on from that, we found out later that the man who directs the Everett show also works with Bowie during the year on his own videos, so obviously there is a big cash involvement.

“And then we all came to the same conclusion, which wasn’t denied at the time by the producer of the show, that Bowie didn’t want us on it and he had pulled the cash lever with the director to get us off it. And that seems to be what happened.

“The last thing we heard from Thames was that they had changed the format of the show and instead of looking into the 80s, it was now decided to look back into the 70s. But that was still not a good enough reason to take us off it because we were the last pop stars of the 70s, so we should have been on it for that reason, more than any other.

“So whatever reason they said, the fact is we were not on it and there was no reason for us not to be on it, except that Bowie didn’t want us on it and he used his influence with the director to get us off it. Now that may or may not be true.

“…I look at [Bowie] in a completely different light now, to how I saw him before. I’ve lost a lot of respect for him because, if that’s how he got where he is today, by doing that sort of thing to other people, then he’s a shitbag!

“…I don’t expect [people] to be taken off shows just because he’s worried about opposition, especially as I’m considered by the press and most Bowie fans alike to be just a cheap Bowie rip-off anyway. If I am a cheap Bowie rip-off, why is he scared of having me on the same programme?

“Obviously I’m not a cheap Bowie rip-off and I must be the biggest competition he has had in the last seven or eight years, and what’s more, he’s worried about it!

“I’m pleased! I’m just disappointed that he should have to resort to such measures because I would like to have spoken to him and met the man. I’ve idolised that bloke for seven years and the first chance I get to meet him, he decides to do that.”

Gary Numan, Smash Hits, 20 October 1980



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 11:53 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“I have thought an awful lot about [the farewell concerts], but I haven’t changed my mind. I’ll never say that I won’t miss it because I will. But it is for the best. I can’t make a film while I’m touring all the time. It drags you back from progressing your career. Maybe that’s why David Bowie only tours every two years – it gives him a chance to catch up again. I didn’t realise until now that that could be the reason.”

Gary Numan, Melody Maker, 1981



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 12:05 PM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“Of course there will be times when I miss going onstage. The last show was very emotional for me. Afterwards I had to go away and be alone for a few moments. I shed a few tears. But I mean it when I say I’m never going to perform live again. This is not Frank Sinatra or Bowie talking. I really mean it.”

Gary Numan, 1981



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/24/06 12:14 PM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

“If I were only a second-rate Bowie, I wouldn’t sell as many records as he does. But he has no reason to be jealous. Bowie has done so much. I’m retiring now anyway, so in six months, I won’t be a threat at all. He’s gonna be there when I’m long finished…Bowie will go on forever. No one can touch him. He’s like the Elvis Presley of my generation. If he died, he would go on. It’s like saying Beethoven and Bach were no different because they were living in the same time doing classical music. Same with me and Bowie.”

Gary Numan, 1981



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 08:03 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"I admire Howard Hughes. And Bowie. And Prince Charles. He's great, he can fly planes - big ones."

Gary Numan, The Face, 1981



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 08:08 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"I like any form of music which involves dressing up. I was against one of the four or five leaders of the New Romantics who is an absolute arsehole. I've no time for him and his God Almighty views of himself and his fashion. He's the epitome of the sort of person I try to avoid. I never say I don't like anybody unless I've met them. Phil Lynott doesn't like me, Bowie doesn't, Jagger doesn't. But that's childish, they've never met me. Jagger said: 'I've never met the guy, but he's one of those people you absolutely loathe.' Wanker! I'm just about old enough to remember him...Poor old Michael..."

Gary Numan, The Face, 1981



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 08:58 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"The one on 'Replicas' [is the fans' favourite look]. Black clothes, blond hair. It's their favourite because it's the first one. Same with Bowie and 'Ziggy Stardust.' They say that's Bowie's best but musically it's nowhere near it. He looks better now; he's mellowed with age. But tell that to a Bowie fan and he'll claw your eyes out."

Gary Numan, 1982




ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 09:06 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"I'm not really sure why I stopped. Opinion was against me. I thought I knew what was going on and I thought I was handling it very well. One day I realised that wasn't the case, and I realised I might never get out of it in one piece. I was doing what Bowie is doing now - three nights at Wembley."

Gary Numan, 1982



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 09:11 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"Now I've realised that you can't go out with a bang, like I did at Wembley. The only way I could do it is to bring out albums without singles, and gradually space out the work until people forget.

"As time goes on, I'll probably play less and less until one day I'll slowly fade out of it and maybe set up my own little business. I could never see myself doing this at David Bowie's age - even if I had his talent."

Gary Numan, 1982



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 09:36 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"[With no character image] I don't think I'm that interesting. I don't think Bowie's that interesting. I don't think any of us are. I don't think we as people are different to anyone else, which is why Bowie walked on stage on his last tour and looked like bloke from Seaside Special. I thought it was horrible. I hated the album, too. I really honestly couldn't see what all the fuss was about. Just compare it to 'Heroes' - chalk and cheese. But I daren't say too much about it because I was always so constantly compared to Bowie. People just say, Oh, you're just saying that cos he's better than you. Everyone knows that. I wouldn't mind being compared to Engelbert Humperdinck. I should come out of that pretty well."

Gary Numan, 1983



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/06 09:39 AM
Re: Gary Numan new [re: ziggfried]  

"I love anything where the French and Germans get wopped. I see myself in a John Wayne type of role. I mean I could never act like David Bowie. I love all those World War Two movies."

Gary Numan, 1983



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/18/07 02:14 AM
Re: The Kenny Everett Show new [re: K]  

"[The Kenny Everett Show incident is] apocryphal. If [Numan] were asked not to come onto the set, it would have been during rehearsals. I do remember having told the studio people that he was welcome to come in for the actual shoot. He never appeared."

David Bowie, Q magazine, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:27 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“[By 1976] I’d caught up with the whole Bowie thing and was a big fan. I think I was 16 when I bought his Aladdin Sane album. I also started going to a gay club in London’s Poland Street called Louise’s. A group of us would travel up on the train to Louise’s, or to another London club, Crackers in Wardour Street, where we persuaded the gay management to let us have our own David Bowie night. The gay club was great, it was the only place you could go without being beaten up if you looked a little out of the ordinary.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.26



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:27 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“A few years [after 1976], Bowie, and large entourage, turned up at a Human League gig at the Nashville Rooms in London. I was standing on a chair at the back and couldn’t resist touching the top of his head as he walked past. The next time I saw him things were slightly different.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.27



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:28 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“During [the early Tubeway Army] period I went to see Mick Ronson at the Rainbow Theatre in London’s Finsbury Park and Iggy Pop on his ’77 tour. I thought Iggy’s The Idiot album was brilliant. Bowie played keyboards at those shows attempting, rather too obviously, to look like a mere band member. Lou Reed was good as well. Tubeway Army used to do a punk cover of the Velvet Underground song ‘White Light, White Heat.’ I also thought the American singer Jobriath was excellent, if a bit off the wall. Jobriath was often dismissed as a David Bowie copy, something that would haunt me in years to come, but I thought he was great.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.35



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:28 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“I started reading William Burroughs. You can read one page of Burroughs and the scrambled text will leave you with little more than a feeling, sometimes a picture, but very rarely any kind of continuous story. It was great for filling you with an onslaught of imagery but horrible if you just wanted a simple tale to follow. He writes by literally cutting up pieces of writing and throwing them together in a haphazard way to create something entirely new but accidental, the infamous cut-up technique. I’ve read that David Bowie has also used this approach extensively. However, I have never used it for my own writing. I prefer to write things that mean something to me rather than make random connections of phrases or words. However, for much of the eighties, whenever I got stuck for a line I would read a page of Burroughs and wait for the images to pour out, hopefully sparking off a train of thought in my own mind. I probably relied far too much on Burroughs for far too long.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.36



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:29 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“I started work at an air freight company called United Marine (1939) Ltd. I was officially an export clerk but I was mainly driving a fork lift truck, loading and unloading the lorries. The manager there was a Bowie fan and he would bring in his Bowie bootlegs which we’d dance around as we worked. He used to let me bring my guitar and amp into work and we’d play when things were quiet, which was most of the time.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.38



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:30 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“I was looking for the hundredth time through the phone directories in the back of the Beggars [Banquet] office when, in the middle of the Earl’s Court edition of Yellow Pages, I came across the name Neumann. Exactly what it was is hard to remember, it may have been a plumber or a kitchen appliance company but whatever, it was the name for me. The only problem was its German origins at a time when David Bowie was working extensively in Berlin. I didn’t want to look as though I was adopting any of his German influences. To get round the problem I dropped the ‘e’ and the extra ‘n’ and so ended up with the N U M A N spelling.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), pp.50-51



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:30 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“It has always been my intention to try and create a much friendlier atmosphere amongst the bands than seemed to exist at the time. I thought that if we all acknowledged each other, said a few kind and complimentary words about each other, everyone would benefit. The problem of being hostile towards other bands is, in my opinion, stupid as well as unnecessary. You run the risk of alienating people who might well have been into your music, if you go around rubbishing other bands. It took me some time to get into Bowie when I was a kid because he said some unpleasant things about Marc Bolan.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.77



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:31 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“The next leg of the [Touring Principle] was to New Zealand where we played dates in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington between May 12-15 (1980). As soon as we arrived in Auckland the atmosphere darkened. I was shocked when I spotted anti-Gary Numan graffiti painted on walls on the trip from the airport to the hotel. I’d traveled 12,000 miles, to the other side of the world, and I was getting the same stick that I got at home. One spray-painted all declared, ‘Numan is not Bowie’ and another one read ‘Numan go home.’"

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), p.85



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:31 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“In addition to performing ‘This Wreckage’ on Top of the Pops I was supposed to be doing ‘I Die You Die’ on the Kenny Everett Christmas Show. It was an excellent and very important show to be on as the ratings were massive. The programme’s director was a man called David Mallet, who also directed many of David Bowie’s videos at the time. After I’d recorded my bit for the show, Mallet told me that Bowie was going to be there the following Thursday and did I want to come along and watch? I turned up a week later, very excited and a little nervous, to watch the great man in action. There was a little side room which I stood at the back of, well out of the way, behind Bob Geldof and Paula Yates, and a reasonable group of other people whom I didn’t recognise. I was very intimidated by the whole thing. I’d only been famous myself for a short time so I was still completely in awe of famous people. Bowie started performing his track and then suddenly everything stopped. A whispered discussion with Mallet followed and then Mallet came over, took me to one side, and said that Bowie had seen me and it would be better if I left. So I was thrown out which, apart from being extremely embarrassing, was really quite sad because I was a huge Bowie fan. Then, a few days after that, I was taken off the Christmas Special as well and I ended up on a normal Kenney Everett show a couple of months later. I was told at the time that Bowie’s hold on Mallet has ensured I was taken off the programme. I was stunned by the whole affair. That a man so huge in stature, practically a living legend, would be so insecure about a new pretender like me was very disappointing. I had expected him to be far above any of that. He seemed so much older than me, so much more at ease with things, firmly established. It surprised me to find out he was just as racked with insecurities as I was, as anybody else.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), pp.99-100



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/22/07 06:32 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

“I’ve now been around a long time and I don’t get upset when I see people selling more records than I do – just as well really as most people are selling more than me at the moment. It’s the nature of the business, we do well, we don’t do well, we just do what we can. I’ve seen hundreds of people come and go since I first made it. You just have to fight for your own career. The success of other artists very rarely has any bearing on your own career, the success of others is nothing to be scared of. I had expected Bowie to be more mature but then again he was younger then than I am now, and I still have a way to go on the maturity front, so I don’t really blame him any more. It was all part of growing up for both of us, I suppose. He also had a dig at me in the music press. He said something along the lines of, what I did, I did very well, but he’d already done it on his Man Who Sold The World album. I read also that the line ‘Same old thing in brand new drag’ on the Scary Monsters album is about me. Who knows? Who really cares? After Kenny Everett, I didn’t give a shit one way or another. He was as scared as I was.

His friend, Mick Jagger, said that he hated me, which I thought was a bit strong. Another friend of Bowie’s, Brian Eno, wasn’t too kind either. He said that, for somebody, me, who had three albums in the album chart you would expect there to be a little more going on. It seemed as though the old guard were getting a little upset with me. At first I was very disappointed, not with Jagger – whom I had considered sad for years – but with the other two. After a while it helped to make me feel as though I was part of a new generation. They no more understood what I was doing than people had understood them when they were new, before they became part of the rock monarchy, the respected elder statesmen.”

Gary Numan, Praying to the Aliens: An Autobiography (1997), pp.100-101




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