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ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 12:29 PM
Mott The Hoople new  

So the old bugger finally gets a MOJO magazine all to himself! It all started for us around the late ’60s. Blues people were studiously eying their tatty plimsolls, and Flower Power bands were showering us all with false love and kisses. A few of us thought it was time for a change. We needed a bit of flair, a bit of showmanship – a revolution for fun!

When I first saw David with the Spiders, the impact was the same as when I first saw Jimi Hendrix. They were totally different musically, but both were visually amazing. David was with Angie at the time and they were experimenting with all kinds of sartorial outrageousness. Suzi Fussey, who later married Mick Ronson, was busy changing his hair and Sue Frost was sewing up outfits for 10 quid a time. David was the icon and Ronno the rocker – and it worked.

They built up an entirely new audience by gigging up and down the country. They had great songs, too. In fact, we rather took a fancy to one of them ourselves! [All The Young Dudes gave Mott The Hoople a top 3 hit in summer 1972.] David was – and remains – a clever lad and master of the move. And, of course, Tony DeFries, his manager at that time, could get an elephant outside of Harrods in half an hour if that was what David wanted.

Ronno’s classical background added a totally unique flavour to it all, while Woody Woodmansey and Trevor Bolder held the back line – and off they were into history. Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders, Mott The Hoople, Roxy Music…

“Nothing like a bit of ballet,” as Freddie Mercury used to say.

Ian Hunter (November 2003), MOJO: David Bowie Special Edition (2004)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 12:43 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“[Bowie scrawled on the box of the ‘Suffragette City’ demo] ‘This might be of some use to you, would you like to cover it?’ We played it and didn’t think it was quite right…[I called Bowie] and said ‘Thanks very much for the tape, we won’t be recording it because we’ve split up. And he sounded genuinely upset…He called me back two hours later and said he’d spoken to Tony DeFries, his manager at MainMan, who would try to get us out of the position we were in. He said, ‘Also, I’ve written a song for you since we spoke, which could be great…[A few days later] Bowie played me this song, ‘All The Young Dudes’ on his acoustic guitar. He hadn’t got all the words but the song just blew me away, especially when he hit the chorus.”

Overend Watts, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.22



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 12:45 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“We couldn’t believe it…In the office at Regent Street he’s strumming it on his guitar and I’m thinking, he wants to give us that? He must be crazy! We broke our necks to say yes! You couldn’t fail to see it was a great song.”

Dale Griffin, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.23



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 12:47 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I remember going to get a pizza with David Bowie while we were recording the album at Trident…His record ‘Starman’ was one the jukebox while we were waiting, and he said, ‘Yours will be on soon.’ I said ‘Yeah, great, but for some reason I’m not as excited as I would have been if it had come from the band.’ And he said, ‘I know what you mean.’”

Verden Allen, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.23



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 12:49 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“We owe a big debt to David, because without [‘All The Young Dudes’], I think we’d have been finished…You can say it might have had an adverse effect on the band’s image, but without it there wouldn’t have been a band. Simple as that.”

Ian Hunter, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.24



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 11:01 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David was trembling [when he first met Mott The Hoople]…He had this big thing, he thought we were very heavy dudes. He used to tell people I was the head of a motorcycle gang and he had this very heavy deal about us.”

Ian Hunter, cited in Alias David Bowie (1987 edition), p.349



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 11:02 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David was one of the few people who can walk in and there is magic in the room. He has a very inquisitive mind, he’s fast, and you feel that the guy knows more than you do so you put yourself in his hands. That has never happened before or since with me.”

Ian Hunter, cited in Alias David Bowie (1987 edition), pp.349-350



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 11:08 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“He sucks, like Dracula. He sucks what he can get and then he moves on to another victim.”

Ian Hunter, cited in Alias David Bowie (1987 edition), p.350



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 11:10 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“The type of thing that Mott had that he never had was humanity. I think he was upset because he never had riots. People were too polite to riot at his concerts.”

Ian Hunter, cited in Alias David Bowie (1987 edition), p.350



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 11:12 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David was in love with us and wanted Tony [DeFries] to manage us. David said to me, ‘Trust him with your life.’ David also said to me, ‘McGovern is going to be the next president.’”

Ian Hunter, cited in Alias David Bowie (1987 edition), p.351



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 00:00 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“On the ‘Dudes’ album, we saw what David [Bowie] and Mick [Ronson] were doing, and we thought we could do that. The only problem with the ‘Dudes’ album was it was a weak mix. David’s production was more mild and pop-oriented.”

Ian Hunter, http://www.mambosons.com/ian-hunter.html


ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 00:09 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Bowie retired and Mick [Ronson] sat home. I was looking for a guitar player and a couple of people – Mick Rock was one of them – said “Why don’t you go see Mick, he’s sitting around not doing anything.’ That was how the whole thing started with Mott. Bowie did ring him up in the 80s and wanted to go out and do – he must have been hard up – he wanted to do the Spiders again, but Mick wouldn’t do it. ‘Why won’t you do it?’ ‘We nearly did.’”

Ian Hunter, http://www.jonslaven.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/hunterinterview.html



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 00:15 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Did 'Drive-In Saturday' get offered to us after 'All The Young Dudes'? Or did they come together? Why did I turn it down? Didn't I like it? Did we have 'Honaloochie Boogie' in the bag? Was there any pressure on [us] to accept it? Well, for a start I was in Mott The Hoople at the time. Whatever Mott did was pretty democratic. It had to be 5-0 before any decision was made (which was more than a bit of a pain), but we never turned it down. We had this arrangement of that song which was completely different (don't ask me - I've forgotten it now) and we wanted to do it. David Bowie is fond of saying he offered it to us and we turned it down. To my recollection, that wasn't the case at all. The only thing I can think of is that Tony DeFries (who managed us both at the time) told David one story and us another."

Ian Hunter, http://www.ianhunter.com/mouth036.shtml



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 00:18 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"[Regarding Mott's stylistic changes] the 'Dudes' album comes to mind. On this album we worked a lot with David and to some extent with Ronno. Also our time with Island [Records] was running out. Island was an end and David felt like a new beginning. We learned a lot about production and we also felt we had to go up a level. The live shows were great but not many bands last without hits. I was aware we had to have hits to survive as Island were pretty much fed up with us. Had we not done the 'Dudes' album I think Mott's legacy and mine would have been much, much smaller. I know some people still preferred us as we were originally, but the business doesn't look at it that way. I personally think what we did was right for the time. We wrote about our time and what we were doing - we were just a little tighter that's all!”

Ian Hunter, http://www.ianhunter.com/mouth036.shtml



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 11:02 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I never understood why [Mott didn’t cover ‘Drive-In Saturday’] because I always thought that would’ve been a great single for them, perfect…I do know that Ian [Hunter] hates owing anything to anyone and he found the idea of singing another Bowie song exasperating.”

David Bowie, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.68



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 11:04 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“[Bowie] said that ‘Drive-In Saturday’ would be our next single but then he changed his mind. But it was great that we now had to come up with something from within the group.”

Dale Griffin, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.68



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 11:54 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"['All The Young Dudes' is] a great song, why stop [performing it]?

I remember going to see Procol Harum, and laboured through the entire set waiting for Whiter Shade of Pale and they didn't fucking do it.

Anyway, if I don't who will? It never really worked for Bowie. Plus, I was a fan. I worked in factories and went to gigs. If I'd gone to see me and I didn't do it, I'd be pissed off."

Ian Hunter, Making Music (April 1997)




ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/29/04 10:21 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“It was Overend Watts who first noticed Mick Ronson and David Bowie. He was always raving on to us about The Man Who Sold The World album. He had a copy of it, which he played in the group car when we were going to gigs. He was saying what a great guitarist Mick was, how he didn’t play like anyone else and had a great style of his own. It was Watts who got us involved with David, after the group split up over an unpleasant nadir in our career in Switzerland. We all came back to England, he rang up Bowie and asked if there was a job going. There wasn’t, of course, but Bowie said ‘Why? What’s happened?’ Then the offer of help came.”

Dale Griffin (July 1999), cited in Mick Ronson: The Spider With The Platinum Hair (2003), p.68



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/29/04 10:23 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“When I first saw [David Bowie and Mick Ronson] on stage, I wouldn’t watch David so much as I would watch Mick, because it made more sense to me. I could see that he was human. David was kind of strange. He wasn’t really a rocker. I was a rocker and I preferred rockers. So I would gravitate towards Mick. I thought he was fabulous.”

Ian Hunter (April 1995), cited in Mick Ronson: The Spider With The Platinum Hair (2003), p.72



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/06/04 05:57 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Bought Disc and Sounds, average week, nearly nothing outstanding to read. It must be difficult for the trades while Bowie is out of the country. Still, they make up for it with Bolan. It’s a wonder he hasn’t committed suicide by now!”

Ian Hunter (21 November 1972), Diary Of A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (1974)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/06/04 05:58 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“It seems all of these acts have never seen David peform. David is David; when he goes on stage he is a complete natural, and his act is totally valid – he doesn’t pretend, but dons a cloak. He’s the only one who’ll come through because he is himself.”

Ian Hunter (29 November 1972), Diary Of A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (1974)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/06/04 06:00 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David, Stu [bodyguard] and George [photographer] appear just in time. Embraces all round – we haven’t seen each other for three months and David looks tired but great. Looks like he’s not been eating again; he’s the only star I know who suffers from regular malnutrition. The charming, disarming urchin from Brixton who never misses a move or a point. Innocence, cruelty, the nearness yet the distance, all the qualities of the star he is – only he knows what he pays for this coveted title, but I’ve sometimes caught glimpses of the sadness.”

Ian Hunter (29 November 1972), Diary Of A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (1974)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/06/04 06:01 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Anyway, it’s great to be together again and out [Bowie] goes to a thunderous welcome. He comes off shaking like a leaf, and we go to the final deafening crash of the tape. He’s watching and sussing all the way through. It will be him tomorrow night. Half of him’s with us and half’s with the audience. Come to think of it, that’s the way I am. Mick [Ralphs, guitarist] does a blinding solo in Ready For Love and all doubt disappears after Angeline – it’s the feeling, ‘We’ve got ’em.” Off we come; beers go down in 30 seconds and then the wait for the right time to go back on. We hurriedly confer and decide to do Dudes and then Honky Tonk Woman. The chaos rises higher as Mott becomes six – Dave thowing out the harmonies with Mick and Pete [Overend Watts, bassist]. Dudes finishes, we acknowledge the guy who wrote our half-million seller, and then we finish on our own. A great gig – not a thing to moan about. That’s two in a row – I can’t believe it!”

Ian Hunter (29 November 1972), Diary Of A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (1974)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/06/04 06:02 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Angela Bowie rings up arranging a tentative party with Bowie, the Spiders and ourselves after David finishes recording but it’s not certain, just a maybe. David rings Mick too, to find out how Roxy [Music] went [at their Madison Square Garden gig the night before]. He never misses keeping up the tabs on the competition.”

Ian Hunter (9 December 1972), Diary Of A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (1974)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/06/04 06:04 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Up to the 18th floor and my first meeting with David in a little while. The room’s long and adjoins a bedroom and the window overlooks 5th Avenue. He’s got a tape machine, a stereo and a moog sprawled around the floor and large room-service tables are everywhere. It’s about 2 a.m. Angie’s still up and is wearing a silver Japanese dress…David looks surprisingly well. He’s got a Japanese bell top on with huge bell trousers and clogs. He’s really into Japanese clothes at the moment.

He plays Drive-In Saturday, a beautiful song which grows on you. It’s Dylanish and it’s got a hell of a chord run down. He says he’s putting it out as the next single. A new version of Dudes on the album is a possibility if David’s satisfied with the final mix. To be honest, I much prefer our version. This seems too slow and he’s done it in a lower key. The sax sounds good in the hookline though – flows right through it. He talks about his plans for the new album. He’s calling it Aladdin Sane. It’s also the title of the fourth track he played which hasn’t yet got a vocal, but sounds great anyway. He’s really got the saxes back together again now and talks of using four saxes when he gets back. Three altos and one bari, and they’ve all got to wear white wide-lapel suits and have Mafia frizzled hairdos with glitter stuck on. He stands there describing it and his eyes are six months into the future already. He’s holding up well under pressure. No sign of a crack-up anyway and he talks enthusiastically. This supreme self-confidence shouldn’t be confused with ego. It’s great to see someone so positive. Guy Stevens [head of Island Records/former Mott manager] told me that to think positive was the all-important key to success and Bowie’s a walking example of this.”

Ian Hunter (10 December 1972), Diary Of A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (1974)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/26/04 11:24 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"If [Mott] were doing OK at the time, I don't think they would have wanted to link up with me, because they were quite macho, one of the early laddish bands. But things weren't good, and I wrote that within an hour or so of reading an article in one of the music rags that their break-up was imminent. I thought they were a fair little band, and I almost thought, This will be an interesting thing to do, let's see if I can write this song and keep them together. It sounds terribly immodest now but you go through that when you're young: 'How can I do everything? By Friday!' So I wrote this thing and thought, There, that should sort them out. Maybe I got my then management to phone up their people: 'David Bowie's written you this song.' And it worked! I was flabbergasted. And then I wrote them Drive In Saturday, but by that time I think they thought, 'Oh, we don't need that wimpy glam-rocker any more. I think they would have done it great."

David Bowie, MOJO #104 (July 2003), pp.78, 79



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/08/04 06:38 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Bowie gave me the knowledge of what Mott was: he was shivering and shaking when he came to see us...he thought I was the ace butch of all time and the band were like, one false move and he'd get smacked. I watched the confidence he had, and my confidence grew with it. He wrote "All The Young Dudes" and produced it. Full stop".

Ian Hunter, Mott The Hoople 1974 Autumn Tour Programme




ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/09/05 10:59 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Good evening. I've never introduced anybody before, but it's quite exciting and this is a great band to introduce. When I was in England, about six months ago, I saw this band for the first time and I thought they were a really good rock 'n' roll band, and we started working together, and I wrote a song for them, and they did a lot of successful things in England with it and I hope the same thing happens to them over here. I know that you'll be a great audience for them, and I look forward to seeing them later...Anyway, now, please welcome from England, Mott The Hoople!"

David Bowie, The Tower Theatre, Philadelphia, 29 November 1972 (recorded on the album All The Way From Stockholm To Philadelphia - Live 71/72)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/09/05 11:03 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"About six months ago, we split up in Switzerland. We had a very nice time after we split up, because although we're not very big in America - in fact, we're pretty small - we're pretty big in England. We get a lot of pressures and then somebody wrote us a song, which we'd like to do for you now...I'd like to introduce you to the guy who wrote the song - David Bowie. We'd like to a do a number for you called 'All The Young Dudes'."

Ian Hunter, The Tower Theatre, Philadelphia, 29 November 1972 (recorded on the album All The Way From Stockholm To Philadelphia - Live 71/72)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/09/05 11:06 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"'All The Young Dudes' didn't do us any good in the way of live gigs and, of course, there was that nagging thing that we hadn't written it ourselves...Having said that, I was really brought down when David decided not to release his version of 'All The Young Dudes' on Aladdin Sane, because then people would have seen just how much of a Mott The Hoople song it really was. He wrote it and produced it, but that was our song, for our audienceI"

Ian Hunter, liner notes for All The Way From Stockholm To Philadelphia - Live 71/72



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 07:58 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"The masters [of the All The Young Dudes album] disappeared. It's a drag 'cos that particular record could have gone with a great remix. There was so much power on that record. David heard it in a much lighter way; that was with his ear. It would have been nice to have gone back and had it sorted out to our ear. It would have been nice to have gone back and had it sorted out to our ear. "Sucker" was enormous and when you heard it, it's mild. Which is cool, but everybody hears sings differently. I'm not complaining, I'm just saying it's a shame that the masters are gone. Buff [Dale Griffin] never got a chance to remix it and turn it into a monster."

Ian Hunter, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 07:59 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"[David Bowie] was doing us so many favours at the time. I don't know what ["Sweet Jane"] was about. Lou [Reed] came in and he sang and I still didn't know what it was about. It didn't really have anything to do with us. It was America. We did it more or less out of gratitude to David for what he did to us."

Ian Hunter, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 07:59 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"I liked Mick [Ronson] a lot. I was getting on with Mick great. We came from similar backgrounds. He was a rocker, where David was more of an effects merchant. David wasn't a rocker."

Ian Hunter, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 08:00 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"David loved [rockers], but he couldn't do it. But he could do something else. His genius lay in other areas y'know. To David it was a role. To Mick [Ronson] it was real. Not that Mick was really a rock 'n' roll guitar player in the tried and true tradition, but I like something a little more classy, which he was, he was so classy as a player. All these people running up and down fretboards, he was just playing - same as his piano playing - simple and creative. Beautiful."

Ian Hunter, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 08:01 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I dunno [where Bowie was the night of the Mick Ronson Memorial Concert], France I think…I dunno [if he should have been there]. It all depends on how you’ve been brought up. You could say, “Where was Morrissey?” But Morrissey’s a manic-depressive anyway and that would only make him worse, so I can understand why he never came. Maybe David had his reasons for not coming. I don’t know. Yeah, it’s a pisser. We had no control over that. I didn’t even think about it. He’s just gonna do what he’s gonna do.”

Ian Hunter, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 08:01 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"I hadn't really heard of [David Bowie] at all. Pete [Overend Watts] was always aware of what was going on. We was lucky he was and he got in touch with him. We'd decided to pack up and Chris Blackwell said we had to do the "Rock 'N' Roll Circus." I had this gut feeling that it couldn't stop. We were on a roll, something had to happen. When Bowie came along to see us he was a bit nervous. We all respected him and worked with him and went along with what he wanted totally. The album had a laid back feel to it. It had a commercial edge to it. Which you've got to do a little bit."

Verden Allen, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 08:02 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"...we helped [Bowie] a lot. He released "Starman" and it didn't work out first time for him I believe and he relaunched it and pushed it again when "Dudes" came out. It wouldn't have stopped him anyway. He's already done it with "Space Oddity" which was a totally different thing."

Verden Allen, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/13/05 08:02 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"I don't think Bowie had the complete song ["All The Young Dudes"] written. He probably had most of it together. He changed a few lyrics around. Some ideas came from us as well. And seeing us playing, perhaps he tailored it a bit more to suit us. Knowing we had a deal with CBS, they were going to give it a big push anyhow. It was good for him as well; it was doing two jobs at once."

Verden Allen, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/14/05 10:27 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"I was very proud about [singing "Soft Ground" on the Dudes album] then, but I don't think it would have been done if David Bowie hadn't been looking after us. The boys weren't too happy about it. I couldn't sing very well then. It was more like talking than singing. But [Bowie] loved it. He played guitar on it as well, that freaky guitar in the middle. Mick [Ralphs] played a bit of guitar. But that sliding bit and all those weird "oohs," he done that. He spent a bit of time on it. He liked it 'cos it suited. He could see where I was at with it. It was a little bit about the group, but not completely. When you start doing something, words come and then you put them together. It wasn't as hard hitting towards the band as it appeared. They probably thought it was, but when Bowie had gone, I couldn't see a chance of me singing anything else anyhow...Mick wasn't very good in the beginning. Ian [Hunter] wasn't a singer really, but they were lucky enough to have a chance. Bowie gave me that chance, but when he'd gone..."

Verden Allen, interview for Two Miles From Heaven fanzine, 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/28/05 10:30 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"[Bowie] just walked in and played ["All The Young Dudes"] on an acoustic guitar. I've never been so grateful for anything in my life."

Ian Hunter, The Guardian, 13 June, 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/28/05 10:31 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"David was extremely good in the studio; his work rate was extraordinary."

Ian Hunter, The Guardian, 13 June, 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/13/05 11:31 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"[Mick Ronson] virtually produced [the 1975 Ian Hunter album]. Mick had learnt all about the studio. And I guess he was on a bit of a mission, to show David [Bowie] that he could still do it."

Ian Hunter, Uncut #97, June 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 12:29 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"The only time I felt intimidated in me life was the first time I worked with Mick Ronson...I was fucking terrified! He'd worked with David Bowie! I just thought, I'm a fucking rock 'n' roller and now I'm gonna get all this shit thrown at me. It wasn't that bad, but I used to be very aware of that."

Ian Hunter, Rave-Up #16, September 1989



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 12:41 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"That's why I wrote [the song "Cleveland Rocks"], in a way. When I first came over, with Mott, you'd do these clubs and nobody would turn up. When we were still with Island [Records], nobody'd be turning up. Then you'd get to Cleveland and it would always be packed. Cleveland and Memphis were the first two towns that picked up on us, long before LA or New York. I just thought, "Well, wait a minute, if this town's such a joke, how come they're picking up on Bowie and us and people like that? Nobody else is picking up on it."

Ian Hunter, Ink 19, December 2000



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 12:43 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"I left [Mott] at the point where [Bowie] had come in and given us a hit record, which was great, but it changed everything. Whatever made Mott the Hoople attractive yet unknown was what it was all about, so when it became a commercial success, it lost a bit of its identity."

Mick Ralphs, The Montreal Gazette, 23 July 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/30/05 09:50 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

""Boy" [from the album Ian Hunter] wasn't about one particular person, it was two or three people and a bit of myself is in there. Everyone thought it was about Bowie but I couldn't give away eight minutes to David! Some of it was about Joe Cocker."

Ian Hunter, cited in the liner notes for Ian Hunter: 30th Anniversary Edition, 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/11/05 04:52 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"When I first heard "All The Young Dudes," sung by David Bowie, strumming an acoustic guitar, I heard it as an anthem - and I think that goes for all of Mott The Hoople - but I'm not sure David thought of it that way and this is probably why our approach worked so well. It sounded like a great rallying call to all the disaffected and dispossessed youth - worldwide - and with the addition of Ian's rapping and ranting to D.B.'s slick production, the whole thing just coalesced into an instant classic...Ian did not copy D.B.'s take on the song, but gave a performance that was all his own."

Dale Griffin, cited in the liner notes of All The Young Dudes: The Anthology, 1998



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/11/05 04:54 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"David said, 'Maybe ["Dudes" B-side "One Of The Boys"] is the single?' I said, 'You've got to be fucking joking."

Ian Hunter (1994), cited in the liner notes of All The Young Dudes: The Anthology, 1998



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/11/05 05:26 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"We did ["Shakin' All Over," "Please Don't Touch" and "So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad)" with Stan Tippins] when [Ian] Hunter stormed out of the studio after Bowie failed to turn up, following a BBC TV Top Of The Pops recording."

Dale Griffin (1990), cited in the liner notes of All The Young Dudes: The Anthology (1998)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
12/26/05 11:37 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"I'd never be considered a technocrat on any instrument. I have a creative force which finds its way through into a musical form. I play a good alto - I played a bit on the Mott album [All The Young Dudes], which is quite pleasing for me, having not touched sax for a long time."

David Bowie, NME, 22 July 1972



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/04/06 00:16 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

""Apathy 83" (from the album All American Alien Boy) was about how rock got all messed up...The innocence is gone now and it's coke and corporates. I used the term Rock 'n' Roll as a substitute for innocence. There isn't any Rock 'n' Roll now, just the music of the young. Rock 'N' Roll with Little Richard and Fats Domino. It wasn't Soft Machine. You had the apathetic seventies and a lot of apathetic bands. Bowie is the only one who did anything."

Ian Hunter, cited in the liner notes of All American Alien Boy: 30th Anniversary Edition, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/05/06 07:45 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“To me, the three legit acts in that whole [glam] movement were Bowie, Roxy and us. I don’t see anybody else. And they talk about everybody else. They don’t talk about us. Bolan? I just thought…lightweight. A lot of people thought he was the king of that whole business, and he may well have been. But I never thought of him seriously. I thought he had the finger on the pulse of what was going on at the time. But a lot of people can ride that little bit of time they’re in.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #110, July 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/05/06 07:46 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David liked the band a lot, and was shocked when he found out we’d split. He offered a demo of ‘Suffragette City.’ I thought we were writing rockers just as good, and I said, ‘That’s not going to work.’ Then David sat cross-legged on the floor, in his publisher’s in Regent Street with an acoustic guitar, and played ‘All The Young Dudes.’ And I knew straight away. I just couldn’t understand why he’d given it to us. We did it real quick. We knew we had to have a hit. We just thought: ‘How do we make this monster?’”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #110, July 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/05/06 07:46 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“If David wants to charm you, you’re charmed. You’d go out to his place, and David Bailey, Cat Stevens, George Harrison were there, and he was charming the pants off them. In those days he was definitely on the make, no messing. He was going all the way.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #110, July 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/05/06 07:47 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David was saying, ‘You can trust [Tony DeFries] with your life.’ I wonder what David says now? That whole [MainMan management] office Tony DeFries and David has was turned over to bailiffs. They had the balls to take over the world, but we had more money – £168! Tony’d be in a stately home and you’d go around for dinner and there’d be oil paintings on the walls 20 feet tall. And he’d explain all this stuff. He’d start from an illogical point, and then make it totally logical. But if you remembered the beginning, it was bullshit. One night I nearly got shot, and he put himself between me and the guy with the gun, backstage in America. So my feelings are weird with Tony. But he was sticky.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #110, July 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/05/06 07:48 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I feel [Mott’s fans are] the same as me. I know a lot of fans like it if you’re aloof. That was David’s game. And it works. DeFries used to say to me, ‘I hate it every time you open your mouth.’ I couldn’t be bothered doing the star thing. We were working-class. I’d look at Lennon, and think, ‘Why the ’ell do I’ave to be the strong, silent type? Lennon just said what was on his mind, why can’t I?”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #110, July 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/05/06 07:48 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Mick [Ronson] came in ’cos he wanted to show David so bad. And the rest of Mott looked at him like, ‘Are you taking over?’ They didn’t get on with Mick. If they’d gone for it, it would’ve been huge. I saw Mick on fire.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #110, July 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:07 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“How do I feel about "ATYD" being a Bowie song? I feel bloody great about it. Mott would have folded if it hadn't been for that song. They would never have become successful and we'd all have been back working at Wiggens. I probably wouldn't have written all the songs I wrote later on because I probably wouldn't have had a record company. People say they wish Mott hadn't gone the route they did, but the truth is we had to - there was no alternative. Damned if we did - damned if we didn't. But "ATYD" was and is a great song. I'm only glad I was able to sing it and it helped the rest of my life. I'm glad you like my songs so much and I appreciate that, but "ATYD" gave me the chance to develop and avoid the factory. I'm really very grateful, and so are all the chaps in Mott. It would be rude to be otherwise.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #12 - March 9, 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:07 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“At Christmas time in either 72 or 73 I got a call from David. I was shattered after a U.S. tour and jet lag. David asked me to go down to London on the morrow to discuss Mott ideas of which he said "were important". I duly ruined our Noel by plodding off down to Hadden Hall with Trudi. By the time I arrived Fred was already there and David did play peekaboo - only it wasn't with me. Fred went to Hampstead Heath and we all went out somewhere. The important Mott ideas. Who knows. Silly bugger. Angie was a lot of fun - uncontrollable though.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #16 - September 5, 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:08 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Slade never seemed like opposition to us. We were more over in the Bowie, Roxy area, but I just wanted to be as good as the Stones and Dylan. The glam pop think was a means to an end, although I must say, we had tremendous fun doing it for awhile.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #18 - December 4, 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:09 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Were any Mott singles written specifically as singles? Was there “pressure” to write singles? You bet there was. “Dudes” gave us the lift, but then what? A nervy nine-month period before “Honaloochie Boogie.” This little song was really important as David was no longer there so if it stiffed, there would be a chorus of “They can't do it without Bowie.” Fortunately, it was a hit, though not as big as “Dudes.” “All The Way From Memphis” was to me, an album track and I didn't want them to release it, but it became a much bigger hit. I then wrote “Roll Away the Stone” which was saved for the Hoople album as CBS knew it was a hit. That was a deliberate single. “Golden Age” also went top 20, but that was more of an album track. “Foxy Foxy” was me experimenting with the Phil Spector sound (something everybody wanted to do at the time). Single? I'm not sure if we had that in mind - probably did. “Saturday Gigs” was the end. It only got to 35 or something and that was it. In hindsight, “Saturday Gigs” should have been a huge hit. That kind of broke the camels back. Ralpher was long gone and it seemed we'd run our course. Two other trifles - I still haven't got a clue what “Honaloochie Boogie” was about; and “Roll Away The Stone” sold over three times as many singles as “Dudes.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #20 - February 21, 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:12 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“[The Dudes album] was done at Trident in London. David produced it - Ronno did the arrangement on “Sea Diver” for £20. And it was on a cigarette packet - legendary stuff! Us chaps in the band listened and learned. In retrospect it was a much heavier album than the one you hear. David's taste running a little lighter than ours - and as the original tape has “disappeared,” Buff [Dale Griffin] cannot go back and remix.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #20 - February 21, 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:13 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I think Ronno did get full credit for his work with Bowie - artistically.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #20 - February 21, 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:15 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I didn't know what “Sweet Jane” was all about so David suggested Lou come in and do a rough vocal. Lou did the rough and then I sang it. I then told Lou an awful joke which lasted at least 20 minutes and we haven't spoken since.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #21 - April 3, 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:16 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“John Graham says, “Putting aside your personal opinions of Bowie, are there any Bowie albums you listen to?” No. “Are there any you consider worthwhile?” Loved the early stuff. “Have I listened to Heathen?” Yes, twice. “What is your opinion?” The first time I liked the first four songs and the last two songs. The second time I wasn't getting any feeling from it so I took it off. I do like the second track. It's a cute rocker.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #24 - August 7, 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:17 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“To my recollection, I had reworked “Drive-In Saturday” with a different arrangement, which I was rather excited about. I was told David didn't want us to do it. David, however, says he wanted us to do it, and we said no. So the memories differ. He could be wrong - I could be wrong. And of course, DeFries was in the middle of all this. He could have told David one thing and us another. I did listen to “Drive-In Saturday” a few years back, and I can't remember what I wanted to do. Maybe he's right. Memories can play tricks on you and a whole lot of shaking was indeed going on. Mott never did it, so that was that.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #29 - February 18, 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:18 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David Bowie wrote [“All The Young Dudes”]; I sang on it. Ralpher wrote the intro riff on it. David gets the bacon. Fabulous song.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #33 - July 18, 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:19 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“When Mott split did Overend give Bowie a call because he'd worked for him before? Actually, I think Pete [Overend Watts] rang looking for a job with David and David said “But you're in Mott” and Pete said we'd split up. David said “No, No, No” and the rest is history. Yes, I'd say Pete was the most enthusiastic “glam” member. He's still very aware of stuff like “looks” and “image.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #36 - October 18, 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:19 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Bobby Ballock saw Bowie at SEC Glasgow. “Dudes” not a patch on Mr. Hunter. Yes, Bob, but Mr. Hunter plays “The Garage” and David plays SEC. He's doing something right.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #38 - December 18, 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:20 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Ralpher wrote the intro [of “All The Young Dudes”]. Initially David played the song to us at a publisher's in Regent Street on an acoustic guitar. The intro came about during the actual sessions which were two evenings at Olympic Barnes in the small room. My reaction is well documented. We all knew 1) it was a hit and 2) we could do it. It was almost tailor made for MTH magic! At the time it was worked out that Bowie would record when Mott toured and Mott recorded when David toured. We had virtually the same crew - including Leee Childers, Tony Zanetta etc.””

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #39 - January 18, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:23 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Why was the Mott album so pressured? Well, Bowie had helped out a lot on Dudes producing and giving us a huge hit. Then all the critics said we couldn't do it without him. We made bloody sure we could, but it was the hardest I've ever worked.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #40 - February 15, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:25 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I didn't know Marc Bolan well. Bowie knew him better. They'd been in a band together. Bolan had some extremely good singles, but I never listened to his albums. He was a great self-promoter. Always telling the British press how huge he was in the U.S. (when he wasn't). He was cheeky - engaging and rather pompous viz-a-vee his standing in British Rock. Still has vociferous supporters.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #40 - February 15, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:26 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“The first night Bowie, Angie and DeFries came to see us, Angie told me it took David four hours to get ready!”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #42 - April 18, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:26 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“'72 must have been amazing time. Ronno on Transformer, Bowie on Dudes. Ziggy taking off. Ronno and I hit it off immediately because we were both working class lads. It just fell together quite naturally, then Bowie retired Ziggy and Mick became available. It was never easy business wise, but we got on great and our wives did too. We'd say hello and then I asked him to arrange “Sea Diver.” Both bands were in Trident at the same time. I remember David rushing me in to listen to “John I'm Only Dancing.” He loved it. I wasn't so sure, but I didn't say anything. Yes, very flash time.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #42 - April 18, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:27 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“What's the difference between Freddie [Mercury], [Mick] Ronson, Bowie and unknowns? Well the difference is these guys have made it so their confidence is much higher than the guys who don't know if they're going to. Mind you, having said that Fred was pretty cocky from the off, and so was David. Are “knowns” easier to work with than unknowns? Depends on the guy.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #43, Part 1 - June 23, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:30 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“All I can say is the only three bands that interested me at that particular period of time were Bowie, Roxy and us. We were all different, but in a way we were similar because although other seventies bands were very popular - some more popular than we were - we were actually writing our time. We were the diary of that period and we still are.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #44, Part 1 - July 17, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:31 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I feel bad about David's [heart] thing but I think he's fine now.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #44, Part 2 - July 17, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:32 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“My favourite songs by: Stones: Don't know; too many. Maybe Brown Sugar. Beatles: Don't know; too many. I like Abbey Road. Little Richard: The Girl Can't Help It. Bob Dylan: Too many - I love Mary Lee's version of 'Idiot Wind.' Jerry Lee Lewis: Ballad of Billy Joe. MTH: Don't know. David Bowie: Life on Mars. Mick Ronson: Blue Velvet Skirt. Hunter/Ronson: Don't know. Zeppelin – Kashmir, Aerosmith: Walk This Way.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #50, Part 1 - February 15, 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:32 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople [re: ziggfried]  

“It was great between Bowie, Mick [Ronson] and us. David was a fan and helped all he could. He had more songs for us for the ATYDs album, but came to a rehearsal and said he liked the ones we'd written and we'd stick with them. Didn't really know Mick as well as David at that time. Mick came later.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #56, Part 1 - September 15, 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:33 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Didn't socialize much [with other bands in the 70s]. Hung out with Bowie a bit and the Queenies [Queen]…Never had a run in with anyone really. Roxy were a great bunch and so were the Spiders. Everybody was just trying to make a living. No real 'A' holes - not that I met, anyway.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #58, Part 1 - November 18, 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:34 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“There's probably a few reasons why [Bowie had nothing to do with Mick Ronson's testimonial gigs], but you'd have to ask him.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #61 - February 17, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:35 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“The original lyric [in “All The Young Dudes”] was, 'Marks + Sparks'. David changed it to 'unlocked cars' as it was his call. The Beeb didn't like Marks 'n' Sparks (free advertising).”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #63, Part 1 - April 17, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:38 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Caleb Miles often thought “Boy” was written about David Bowie and how many times have I heard this before! Sorry to disappoint, but it wasn't. His manager might have got a couple of references though!”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #63, Part 1 - April 17, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/08/06 06:39 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“David wrote [“All The Young Dudes”] so he gets the publishing. We recorded it so we get a royalty from the record company.”

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #64, Part 2 - May 18, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/28/06 10:33 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"David probably demoed the vocal [of "Dudes"] and then I probably worked on my interpretation of it afterward. As far as I can recall, the harmonies were Buff [Dale Griffin], David, Mick [Ralphs] and Stan [Tippins] - but I can't be sure. Am I the first Brit rapper? Who knows?"

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #69, Part 1 - 13 November, 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/20/07 02:59 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Lou came down [to the All The Young Dudes sessions]. I've got Lou singing ["Sweet Jane"] at the moment. I've got to put Ian on, but he doesn't know the lyrics yet...Lou phrased it so Ian can pick up how it was...It's really good...The album is fabulous. They've never written better stuff. They were so down when I first met them...everything was wrong. Everything was terrible, and because they were so down I thought I was gonna have to contribute a lot of material. Now, they in a wave of optimism and they've written everything on the album bar one Lou Reed number and the "Dudes" single I did for them. They were being led into so many directions, because of general apathy with their management and recording company. Everybody was very excited about them when they first came out and then, because they didn't click immediately, it fell away. When I first saw them and that wasn't very long ago, I couldn't believe that a band so full of integrity and a really naïve exuberance could command such enormous following and not be talked about. The reactions at their concerts were superb, and it's sad that nothing was done about them. They were breaking up, I mean, they broke up for three days and I caught them just in time and put them together again 'cause in fact all the kids love them."

David Bowie, NME, 22 July 1972



ziggfried
(acolyte)
06/18/07 10:27 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“If it hadn’t been for Guy [Stevens, Mott’s first manager/producer]…I mean, we did four stiff albums for Island Records, nowadays that’s unheard of, y’know, pretty much unheard of then. Guy kept that going, and then David gave us “All The Young Dudes”, which was the real big leg-up, y’know, and then Tony [DeFries] was…I dunno so much Tony, Tony wasn’t really that keen on us. It was David that was keen on us, and so Tony did what David wanted, y’know?…He hated me talking on stage, ’cause he wanted to give that Bowie kind of…He said, ‘Every time you open your mouth, it drives me crazy. I wish you would not do this…’ A joke…I’m not David, d’you know what I mean? I’m Ian!”

Ian Hunter, 2004



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/08 10:49 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“We did split up in 1972, in Switzerland. We were right at the bottom of the ladder playing in a converted gas tank and we didn’t see the point anymore. Coming back from Switzerland, we were all great mates again because the pressure was off. Pete Watts went to audition for Bowie and David’s like: “What are you doing here? Looking for a gig? You can’t do that, you’re Mott the Hoople, you’re great!”

“I’d never met Bowie: I’d seen him once doing his performance art thing, in about 1965. I knew he was great, but I didn’t like what he was doing. But the women lined up after his show – it was obvious the guy had something.

“Bowie offered us “Suffragette City” first, which I liked but I knew it wouldn’t get on radio. Radio was closest to us, so I knew we needed something special. I thought it would be something like “You Really Got Me” (Mott had previously covered the Kinks classic). But when he played “…Dudes,” I could see how could go to town and really do a number on it. I’m a peculiar singer but I knew I could nail it.

“I wondered why he was giving it to us. [Mick] Ronson told me later that he’d done it himself and he wasn’t too happy with it. At the time, he told us that he’d written it specially for us, but that turned out not to be the case.

“David was saying, it’s a bit boring at the end, it needs something else. We’d done a gig at The Rainbow [Finsbury Park, London] the night before and I emptied a bottle of beer over a heckler and did the rap that I put on the end of the song.

“Now when Bowie does it he puts the rap on, I don’t do it anymore. The song made us instant gays: we were tranny magnets when we played in the US. Touring with Bette Midler probably helped add to that reputation. At first I was scared to go into gay clubs but it was fabulous, people loved us there, we had some great hilarious times.

“A lot of the fans didn’t like it when we had the hit – it was like their secret was out of the bag. The thing in the press that we couldn’t do it [have hits] without Bowie. We hadn’t anticipated that. We learned a lot from Bowie, but I knew after that we had to write and we worked our asses off. We knew there was a backlash from “…Dudes,” we kind of jumped on the glam bandwagon, too, dressing up and all that. Some of the old fans and even some of the band didn’t like it, but it was something we had to do.

“Later, when I wrote “Hymn for the Dudes,” it was a way of saying ‘it’s going to be all right.’ Though, of course, it wasn’t.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #128, January 2008, p.36



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/08 10:50 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“Coming back from Switzerland there was talk of splitting up but I couldn’t see it happening. OK, we didn’t have a hit, but we were still going doing great live. Island [Records] had arranged the rock ‘n’ roll circus [a variety package similar to the Rolling Stones’ 1969 TV special] with a knife thrower, performing dogs and Max Wall. When we told Chris Blackwell we were going to pack it in, he said, “If you do, I’ll see to it that none of you work again.” I was bloody happy he said that – I didn’t want to pack up. Why pack up after struggling so hard? The ironic thing is that when we had the hit with “…Dudes,” I went and left, like an idiot. I could kick myself in the arse now.

“Bowie was a little nervous when he played the song. We were all crowded around him in a circle. We went on tour and he sent us flowers and congratulatory telegrams to our dressing room, telling us the studio was booked.

“At the recording he held back; it was a different approach to working with Guy [Stevens] – he wanted it basic and commercial. Later when Bowie tried to do the same thing on the album, things went a bit iffy. There was a buzz around when we were recording it – Mickie Most turned up to see what was happening. You knew something was happening when hit makers started sniffing around.

At first, when Bowie mixed it, the organ was extremely low. There was a bloke sat in the corner, I never knew his name but he was obviously a top guy at CBS. He could see I wasn’t very happy and he came over and said, “I think you’d better mix it again, Dave.” He rebooked the studio the next day with the instruction: “Organ track up!” I thought: what a great bloke. He was very important to the record.

“Doing Top of the Pops wasn’t very good for me. I had my Hammond with a bloody swastika on the back. I was a bit naïve then, it was something I brought in to Chris Farlowe’s shop and it fitted a hole that had been blown at the back of the organ. There were a lot of Jewish people at the studio: nobody said anything, but they just pushed the organ to the side of the stage.

“The girl at CBS was phoning us up everyday with sales figures – in the end it was like: “Do us a favour, love, and let us get some sleep.” We weren’t really that excited because the song had come from someone else, not from the group.

“The gay society of LA welcomed us with bouquets. Our roadies Lee and Zee were ultra gay – they picked up blokes wherever we played. The Mott sound changed after I left – brass, backing singers and it became Ian’s band, they had more hits but never got higher than “All the Young Dudes.””

Verden Allen, Uncut #128, January 2008, p.38



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/08 10:51 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“When we went to Zurich it was like the Dawn of the Dead, bloody awful. But it was just the latest in a long line of break ups – we always came back from the brink. Pete Watts was a fan of both Bowie and Mick Ronson and they began communicating with each other. Bowie was a breath of fresh air in the studio – he knew exactly what he wanted, but he was also very easy going, great with people. Everything he did worked, and worked very well. He really understood musicians.

“We used to sit in the studio watching him, it was fascinating because the recording we’d done before then was with Guy Stevens, and he was heading in a dangerous direction, breaking and smashing things. Mott were one of the things he was going to smash. He was having mental problems, very sad.

“The weird thing is, “…Dudes” ruined Mott the Hoople. We had a massive fanbase and as soon as they heard “…Dudes,” all those fans went away. It completely buggered us for a while. Having a hit record was a tremendous boost for us – we went from losers to being a band that was going somewhere.

“It affected Ian. He was doing slightly cod Bob Dylan things that we’d been getting away with for some time, and one of Bowie’s suggestions was that he didn’t do that any more. In America we stayed at the Riot House but we didn’t party like Zeppelin – Lee and Zee would have killed us if we had. Those two were really fantastic people from Bowie’s crowd, really great fun.

“It was very difficult for four members who wanted to get songs in. But really only Ian was writing them. I think Ian ended up wanting to get some people out of the band. I think he’d have liked to have got me out because he never wanted me in, he thought I was shit. Also, he forced Ronno [Mick Ronson] on us. He wouldn’t speak to us which caused a lot of bad feeling. You couldn’t continue a band that way, it had to end.”

Dale Griffin, Uncut #128, January 2008, p.38



ziggfried
(acolyte)
01/06/09 08:02 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“What happened was, when Bowie came over [to America], and Mott the Hoople came over and Roxy, they didn’t really like us on the Coast much…When we went to Cleveland, that was the first time we sold a club out, and it was the same for David and it was the same for Roxy…And at the same time, Carson would be on and Mike Douglas and people like this, Merv Griffin, and Cleveland was kinda like the Poland of America, and I didn’t like that, ’cause we thought we were cool, and we thought the coolest place was Cleveland, so I wrote the song [“Cleveland Rocks”].”

Ian Hunter on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, 13 June 2007




ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/09/09 06:43 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

Paul T. Bennethum: After hearing Bowie mention it after all these years would you reconsider doing 'Drive In Saturday'?

Ian Hunter: Originally I know I had a great idea for the rearrangement of this particular song and in recent years I did go back to the song but my idea has gone from my memory. Sorry.

The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #102, Part 1 - 1 September, 2009



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/11/10 07:52 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“We had a huge live following but no one bought our bloody records. We broke up in Switzerland. In a fucking gas tank. A gas tank is not a good place to play and a truly horrible place to break up. I always remember how fucked off we were, and what a big relief it was to split. Bowie heard about the split and enquired about a bass player, ’cos he needed one. I then said we needed a song, and Bowie offered us “Suffragette City”, which I didn’t feel was good enough. I always felt we needed to record a song as good as “You Really Got Me”. Bowie sat down on the floor and played us “All the Young Dudes”, and it was every bit as good as I hoped it would be. After years of being this cult band we had a hit, but then ironically you lose your core. They think you’ve sold out. You’re damned if you make a few bob and damned if you don’t. No one ever joined a rock ‘n’ roll band to get rich.”

Ian Hunter, Uncut #157, June 2010



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/11/10 07:53 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

Ben Marshall: I was told a story that on Christmas Day 1972 David Bowie rang you, demanding your presence, which necessitated you driving jetlagged from Heathrow to the West Midlands, only to arrive and be told that David had had a bit of an episode and you weren’t really needed. Any truth to that?

Ian Hunter: Absolute nonsense. To begin with, it wasn’t Christmas Day. It was Boxing Day. Bowie rang up a mate of mine and told him he had this great idea and that he wanted to tell me all about it. I’d just come back from the US, so I was jetlagged, but I didn’t drive up to the West Midlands, it was somewhere in the West Country. So we turn up waiting to hear The Idea, and Bowie keeps sloping off to the bathroom, goes in one person and comes out another. I had no idea what was happening, I just sat there like a bricklayer’s labourer, totally bloody clueless. He never got round to telling me about the world’s greatest idea.

Uncut #157, June 2010



ziggfriedModerator
(acolyte)
07/02/11 04:41 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Matt Parrish was watching the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert - asks what I said to David just after 'Dudes'? Can't divulge that - but it wasn't negative."

Ian Hunter, The Horse’s Mouth, Issue #121, 1 June 2011



ziggfriedModerator
(acolyte)
05/11/12 10:20 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Mick [Ronson] told me David rang him up to reform the Spiders - I said, 'What did you say?' 'I said - don't be daft - it's been done.' I can't remember when he told me that, but I'm pretty sure it was during his time in Woodstock. One thing with Ronson - he was very modest, so I believed him."

Ian Hunter, The Horse's Mouth #132, 2 May 2012




ziggfriedModerator
(acolyte)
08/25/12 00:35 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"After all the hippy rubbish, we decided we’d have a flashy stage show, and that coincided with the start of the whole glam-rock thing in the early 1970s. Some of the guys back then—David Bowie and Marc Bolan—could pull off the glitter, but we just looked like a bunch of bricklayers in drag!"

Ian Hunter, Reader's Digest, 2012



ziggfriedModerator
(acolyte)
08/25/12 00:37 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

"Mick [Ronson] played with David Bowie in the Spiders from Mars, but he briefly joined Mott the Hoople and we ended up working together many times before his death in 1993. He wasn’t just a band mate, he was my mate. Our wives and kids were mates. He knew he had cancer about two years before he died, and it was a horrible time. He was just 46 and had so much life ahead of him...and then that happens. But Mick was amazingly positive. He’d come back from the hospital and say, “There are seven-year-old kids with it. What right do I have to complain?” Miss him? ’Course I do."

Ian Hunter, Reader's Digest, 2012




ziggfriedModerator
(acolyte)
08/25/12 00:45 AM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

“I had been in a factory, I knew what it was like to work for a living, I had made a lot of mistakes. David (Bowie) operated like a man from another planet, which was fantastic – he never talked to people. Mott got off stage and were hanging out with the fans.”

Ian Hunter, Birmingham Post, 17 August 2012



ziggfriedModerator
(acolyte)
07/16/13 06:47 PM
Re: Mott The Hoople new [re: ziggfried]  

Q: How were the dynamics with Bowie and you on ‘All the Young Dudes’ the album?’

A: It was great. We did the single and then he came down to a rehearsal to see if we needed any more material for the album. He heard what we had and thought we had enough material of our own to make it work. The ‘Dudes’ album was done at Trident in London. Angie was bringing in clothes for David to try on daily. David and Trudi [Hunter] would compare make up; it was strewn all over the floor. It was very much a gang affair – totally positive – no egos. I really enjoyed it. Plus, we were hot and Dave was meteoric at the time so the confidence was pretty high. Pete [Watts] and Mick [Ralphs] could probably tell you more – they have better memories than I do, but the whole thing was positive excepting the final mixes, which Buff [Dale Griffin] in particular, thought were a little light. We have since wanted to remix ‘Dudes’ but the tapes have magically disappeared.

Ian Hunter, The Horse's Mouth #114, July 2013




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