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ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/04 10:55 AM
Iggy Pop new  

"I think he respected me for putting myself in a loony bin. He was the only guy who came to visit me...Nobody else came...nobody. Not even my so-called friends in LA...but David came."

NME, 1977

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/04 10:59 AM
Iggy on Bowie, #2 new [re: ziggfried]  

"Bowie was kooky. That's the kind of person I tend to hang around with. I learned a lot from Bowie, about hard work and applied strategy."

The Guardian, 1996

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/25/04 11:06 AM
Re: Iggy on Bowie, #3 new [re: ziggfried]  

"I was not executive material like him. I couldn't do the things he seemed to do so well and so easily. Yet I knew I had something he didn't have and could never have."

Mojo, 1996

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/27/04 10:10 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #1 new [re: ziggfried]  

“Iggy's amazing. He really has nothing to do with rock and roll, he's in it by accident. He's just the best… "

David Bowie, NME, March 1976

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/27/04 10:17 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #2 new [re: ziggfried]  

"He'll never make it to the recording studios in time. He'll fall asleep or get machine-gunned down in a garage. Iggy's doomed."

David Bowie, Sunday Times Magazine, July 1975

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/27/04 10:26 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #3 new [re: ziggfried]  

“They just don't appreciate Iggy…He's Lenny fucking Bruce and James Dean. When that ad lib flow starts, there's nobody like him. It's verbal jazz, man!"

David Bowie, Rolling Stone, February 1976

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/27/04 10:29 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #4 new [re: ziggfried]  

“Terence [Stamp] is going to be Iggy's father [in the Diamond Dogs movie]. Isn’t that lovely? I can't wait to direct it. I think, you see, that the most talented actors around are all in rock and roll. Iggy never should have been a rock & roll singer, he's an actor.”

David Bowie, Rolling Stone, February 1976

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/27/04 10:36 PM
Re: Bowie on Iggy, #5 new [re: ziggfried]  

“I think Iggy stands a very good chance of becoming one of the important young actors in America. I really do. I've seen it. I've put him in front of a camera on several occasions; I've got him falling around doing pretend scenes from method films, and he's absolutely sensational. And nobody will pick him up. They're scared stiff of somebody they consider an amateur. They don't see what he's got. They don't understand that he's not bizarre and outrageous, they can't see that he is, in fact, the essence of the entire mid-American youth syndrome. He is very much the all-American boy. Of course he needs experience. He needs to do a lot more public entertaining. But it's all a part of this thing about watching the crack-up of artists, which I think is a fundamental of rock & roll. Watching artists showing themselves up; watching artists crack open a bit and seeing what they're really like inside. That's why rock & roll is so important. Not seeing superheroes. Watching the process of a person learning how to come to terms with what he really is. Suddenly seeing an artist recognize his own failings. The emphasis is not on watching somebody who's invulnerable and godlike. That's not the thing. People go to concerts to gain information, and the information they go to get is that of seeing an artist reconcile himself with his own failings, gradually, over a period of years.”

David Bowie, Circus Magazine, April 1976

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/27/04 10:41 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #6 new [re: ziggfried]  

“I think that's why Iggy is gonna be so enormous. He's not hard and knowledgeable and all knowing and cynical; all of that has gotten so boring. Every artist always knows the answers of the world; it's so tiring. It's nice to see someone for a change who hasn't a clue. But has insights.

”…That's the charming thing about him, that you can really see the bruises on him. Everybody likes to see someone bruised. No one likes to see a star smile. No one likes to see a happy star. And they're not likely to, either, 'cause there ain't many of 'em.”

David Bowie, Circus Magazine, April 1976

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/04 12:06 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #7 new [re: ziggfried]  

"...other bands cover Presley or the Velvet Underground; I cover Iggy Pop. I think he’s getting better and better as a songwriter, substantially as a lyricist. There’s a fabulous maturity around what he’s doing. He’s my favorite contemporary songwriter."

David Bowie, Music & Sound Output, June 1987

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/04 12:12 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #8 new [re: ziggfried]  

"We both went through similar drug problems in the Seventies and tried to keep each other together during that period. We just became real close buddies. We’re very different from each other. That probably has a lot to do with it, because there’s no boredom and similarity that you often get if you’re too close together in your ideas. That’s probably why our relationship’s lasted so long.”

David Bowie, Music & Sound Output, June 1987

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/04 12:17 PM
Bowie on Iggy, #9 new [re: ziggfried]  

"I was working with Iggy writing the songs for his album…We went to Gstaad with our respective women and had a skiing holiday which went on for three months. It was fantastic, but in the evenings we were able to write. I took a four-track up there. We wrote in the evenings and skied in the day, and then went down to Montreaux and recorded Blah Blah Blah there. It worked out so well that I thought I’d record my album the same way."

David Bowie, Music & Sound Output, June 1987

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/04 09:52 PM
Iggy on Bowie again new [re: ziggfried]  

“That song was all Bowie’s idea: 'Write a song about the Stooges; call it Dum Dum Boys.' He egged me on. It took the unrelenting love and determination of the drummer, Rock [Scott Asheton], who kept calling every year or two. I thought, ‘My God, a Stooges reunion? I’m gonna have 30 bikers in my bathroom shooting up crystal meth.’”

Iggy Pop, Blender, September 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/04 09:58 PM
The perils of going to a Bowie concert new [re: ziggfried]  

“I always got a lot of support from [gay] people, and I learned from a lot of really talented gay people. I’m to the left of tolerant, but I’ve never had a gay experience. Two or three times, excited gay friends wanted to, like, nibble my nuts — generally when I was passed out or distracted. And then I’d go, 'Hey! Bruce! Cut it out!' And that would be the end of that. The gayest it got is some guy approaching my scrotum with oral intent. I was mistaken for gay at a Bowie concert once, because of my flamboyant dress and friendly manner, and a bunch of California toughs beat the shit out of me. Fifteen stitches. I thought to myself, 'So this is what it’s like.'”

Iggy Pop, Blender, September 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/31/04 10:05 PM
Iggy's typical day in Berlin, Spring 1976 new [re: ziggfried]  

“Get up in the morning on the fourth floor of a cold-water building and take a sponge bath. Cut a little brown bread and cheese — I had a knife, one knife — and eat. Then walk all over the city, which hadn’t changed since 1910: organ grinders who still had monkeys; quality transvestite shows. A different world. By evening, I’d go have dinner with the Bowies, see a film or watch Starsky and Hutch — that was our big thing, me and Bowie. If there wasn’t enough to do, I knew some bad people, and I’d get stoned or drunk. Sometimes I’d do the bad stuff with the Bowies and the good stuff with the bad people.”

Iggy Pop, Blender, September 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/03/04 11:48 AM
Iggy, Bowie & Al from "Quantum Leap" new [re: ziggfried]  

“I was in a mental hospital and [Bowie] happened to be there for another reason…And he came up one day, stoned out of his brain in his little space-suit, with Dean Stockwell the actor. They were like, ‘We want to see Jimmy. Let us in.’ Now the strict rule was to never let outsiders in: it was an insane asylum. But the doctors were star-struck, so they let them in. And the first thing they did say was. ‘Hey, want some blow?’ I think I took a little, which is really unpleasant in there. And that’s how we got back in touch.’

Iggy Pop (1996), cited in Mojo: David Bowie Special Edition, 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/03/04 11:54 AM
Iggy when he was lonely new [re: ziggfried]  

“[I was feeling] miserable, lost, lonesome and nostalgic…[Yet] I had been offered an opportunity in that David Bowie offered me the chance to make solo records, basically with him as my band. And at the time that he offered me that, they guy was a white-hot talent.”

Iggy Pop, cited in Mojo: David Bowie Special Edition, 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/03/04 12:03 PM
Iggy on Bowie as Producer new [re: ziggfried]  

“To work with [Bowie] as a producer…He was a pain in the arse – megalomaniacal, loco! But he had good ideas. The best example I can give you was when I was working on the lyrics to Funtime and he said, ‘Yeah, the words are good. But don’t sing it like a rock guy. Sing it like Mae West.’ Which made it informed of other genres, like cinema. Also, it was a little bit gay. The vocals there became more menacing as a result of that suggestion. He has a work pattern that recurs again and again. If he has an idea about an area of work that he wants to enter, as a first step, he’ll use slide-projects or work for other people to gain experience and gain a little taste of the water before he goes in and does his…And I think he used working with me that way also.”

Iggy Pop, cited in Mojo: David Bowie Special Edition, 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/04/04 11:21 AM
James Williamson & Bowie new [re: ziggfried]  

“[James Williamson and I] were a pretty scary duo, particularly when we lived in London. We were intense people and everyone was frightened of us except Bowie, who’d come around the house and show us his newest hairdo. James would always be like, Get that fucking platform-shoe faggot out of here, we’re trying to make man’s music here!”

Iggy Pop, Q, April 1996

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/04/04 11:25 AM
Iggy, Bowie and The Origin Of Lust new [re: ziggfried]  

“David Bowie wrote [Lust For Life] in Berlin, in front of a TV on a ukelele…He cribbed the rhythm of the army forces network TV theme, which was a guy tapping that beat on a morse code key. Ever the sharp mimic, David picked up the nearest available instrument and started strumming.”

Iggy Pop, Q, April 1996

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/04/04 11:31 AM
Iggy, Bowie and Movies new [re: ziggfried]  

“When we practised for The Idiot tour, David, I, Hunt and Tony Sales and all the rest had an entire screening room in the old UFA studios where they made all the movie greats…You know, like Metropolis. Fritz Lang worked there before the Nazis took it over. Many great films were made at UFA. They still had all these wonderful German Expressionist films just sitting in cans rotting, because they still can’t figure out the politics of who should get them. You could smell the film slowly going bad.”

Iggy Pop, I Need More (1982)

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/04/04 11:34 AM
Bowie, Iggy and Drugs new [re: ziggfried]  

“Touring with Iggy’s band…That was very enjoyable for the most part. It was the first time I’d ever really put myself into a band since the Spiders. But with this I was an integral part of the band where I didn’t really do anything other than be a band member. It was great not having the pressure of being the singer up front. But there were too many drugs around at the time. I was trying to get away from those drugs and I was going through these really ambivalent things because I kept wanting to leave the tour to get off drugs. The drug use was unbelievable and I knew it was killing me, so that was a difficult side of it. But the playing was fun. Iggy would be preening himself before he went on and I’d be there reading a book.”

David Bowie, Q, May 1993

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/08/04 12:01 PM
Bowie, Iggy and Raw Power new [re: ziggfried]  

“But the most absurd situation I encountered when I was recording was the first time I worked with Iggy Pop. He wanted me to mix Raw Power, so he brought the 24-track tape in, and he put it up. He had the band on one track, lead guitar on another and him on a third. Out of 24 tracks there were just three tracks that were used. He said 'see what you can do with this'. I said, 'Jim, there's nothing to mix'. So we just pushed the vocal up and down a lot. On at least four or five songs that was the situation, including Search and Destroy. That's got such a peculiar sound because all we did was occasionally bring the lead guitar up and take it out."

David Bowie, International Musician, December 1991



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/20/04 12:08 PM
Davey & The Stooges new [re: ziggfried]  

“Very few people recognized the quality of the Stooges' songwriting, it was really meticulous. And to his credit, the only person I'd ever known of in print to notice it, among my peers of professional musicians, was Bowie. He noticed it right off, and he listed us as his favorites in some music poll. Somebody showed it to me and I said, 'Who the fuck is that? Never heard of him!'”

Iggy Pop, Raw Power liner notes, 1997

ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/20/04 12:16 PM
Iggy, Danny, Davey & Tony new [re: ziggfried]  

"I realized The Stooges couldn't do anything more in Detroit, we'd gone as far as a Detroit band as we could, got as far as we'd gotten and disbanded. If we came back and reassembled something in Detroit and worked from that base, people wouldn't stay behind it. Because our momentum would've been diminished. I realized that I was gonna have to take this national or, if possible, international. That was where Tony DeFries came in. While I was in New York on Steve Paul's dime, sleeping on Danny Fields' banquette, this guy DeFries came to town with Bowie looking to co-opt the American avant-garde. I was an interesting candidate to join that circus to them.

Bowie knew about me and I think it was just a happy coincidence that I just happened to be in town, or a freak coincidence! I just happened to be in town, and Fields just happened to be stationed in his usual pit position at Max's Kansas City's backroom, where Bowie and his team were making the scene. Fields called me and said, 'Get down here, you can do yourself some good!' I said, 'Aw, I'm watching Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Jimmy Stewart is so sincere, I can't tear myself away,' I was practically in tears over Jimmy Stewart fighting these corrupt bastards and all that, so I didn't go down. So Fields called me about an hour and a half later, 'Get down here, goddamn it!' I said, 'When the movie's over!' So I waited til the movie was over and it was late but they were still down there.

We talked and I could tell right away that Bowie and DeFries were nutters. Steve was a carney, he'd started his career selling blackhead removing pencils through the back pages of Popular Mechanics, so he was still pretty much meat-and-potatoes, 'Let's get some fast bucks here,' a carney. But Bowie and DeFries were British music hall, pure vaudeville. I've always had a good sense of who's going somewhere and a good sense of circus, and I could just see there was a circus in town -- 'Join!' That was my immediate instinct. I thought this could be good for me right off.

David diplomatically suggested, 'Well, you know what we could do Iggy, what would be a great idea, there's a wonderful band in England, World War 3 with Edgar Broughton, have you heard of them? They're very heavy in England and they could be a wonderful backup band for you.' Bowie and DeFries had a very pop mentality the way they did things, 'You'll have a band, we could have this done in a half- hour!' Of course, guess who'd write the song -- not me!

But to give them their due, Bowie, DeFries, all the MainMan management people he later hired here, all these out-of-work actors -- these people had a real appreciation for the arts. It went very deep, and still does with Bowie. It's his great strength that he knows how to spot something that's not related to mainstream entertainment, bring it over to his camp where he can relate to it in some way, put his name on it and get involved, work with it and then send it out to a bigger public. It's what he does really well. But he couldn't do that well if he didn't really have an eye and an ear for this stuff. And DeFries is the same way. It's no accident he signed Bowie, then me, then later Mellencamp. When I'd talk to DeFries and tell him my ideals and my mad theories about life and theatre and music, he would listen. He had an affection for that and tried to respect it.

But Bowie knew my records and he was intelligent and friendly and decent and smart, and I could see it and I thought, 'This is pretty cool.' I could talk to this guy. And DeFries I thought was a character, I thought people will go for this guy, he had a big cigar and a big pointed nose and a great big Afro and a smug look on his face and an English accent and a big fur coat and a belly! And to the people who were running the American industry it just spelled 'Hot Manager!' He had an image and it would work, it would sell.”

Iggy Pop, Raw Power liner notes, 1997



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/20/04 12:21 PM
More Power new [re: ziggfried]  

“DeFries just out and out flat refused to put [Raw Power] out. He said, 'OK, we're gonna put it out, go away somewhere.' They shuffled me off to Los Angeles, where I didn't want to go, a real bad place to send me. They told me by phone later, 'We're not releasing it like that, David will remix it.' To which I said OK, because the other choice was I wasn't going to get my album out. I think DeFries told me that CBS refused to release it like that, I don't know. Who knows what the real story was? David and I and one of his bodyguards/gofers at the time, Stewie, went to Western Studios in Hollywood. To the best of my recollection it was done in a day. I don't think it was two days. On a very, very old board, I mean this board was old! An Elvis type of board, old-tech, low-tech, in a poorly lit, cheap old studio with very little time.

To David's credit, he listened with his ear to each thing and talked it out with me, I gave him what I thought it should have, he put that in its perspective, added some touches. He's always liked the most recent technology, so there was something called a Time Cube you could feed a signal into -- it looked like a bong, a big plastic tube with a couple of bends in it -- and when the sound came out the other end, it sort of shot at you like an echo effect. He used that on the guitar in 'Gimme Danger,' a beautiful guitar echo overload that's absolutely beautiful; and on the drums in 'Your Pretty Face Is Going To Hell.' His concept was, 'You're so primitive, your drummer should sound like he's beating a log!' It's not a bad job that he did. Somebody's since put out something on Bomp, Rough Power, which were some of my original mixes, but I think what David and I came up with at these sessions was better than that. So I think he helped the thing. I'm very proud of the eccentric, odd little record that came out.

In retrospect, I think the little touches Bowie put on the mix helped and I think some of the things MainMan did helped, and more than anything else, what the whole experience did was to get me out of Detroit and onto a world stage. And also I learned a helluva lot being over there in England and I started thinking differently. It led to a very ambitious piece of work, and that's fine. But the fact was that neither Bowie's mix nor my previous mix could do justice to the power of the band or even to the legibility of the vocal…I feel that now I have the wherewithall, the position, and the expertise at my disposal to give this thing its due sonically, and I didn't have that before. So it's kind of like I'm finishing that off. I don't think you can beat David's mix, it's very creative. But this is just a simple, straight band mix of a powerful band. I feel like there's a closure on it and that's a nice thing.”

Iggy Pop, Raw Power liner notes, 1997



ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 11:38 AM
Bowie on Iggy new [re: ziggfried]  

"I think maybe [Iggy and I] opened up some new avenues in what his approach could be to in terms of singing. I think he got into a whole new idea of melody lines and stuff, working with me. But on the other hand, I enjoyed working with him with his lyrics, the way he would work with lyrics. It's quite extraordinary. Still something I could never do. He works in a very different way to me."

David Bowie, 1993

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 11:48 AM
China Girl new [re: ziggfried]  

"[China Girl has an] extraordinary lyric, and it was really sort of thrown out as [Iggy] was writing it. It was literally thrown out on the recording session, almost verbatim. He changed maybe three or four lines. But it was an extraordinary talent that he has for spontaneous free thought."

David Bowie, 1993

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 11:57 AM
Bowie discusses their differences new [re: ziggfried]  

"We're very, very different from each other. He's a lot more exuberant than I am, I think. I tend to be quieter, more reflective. He's always kind of on the dangerous line as well. I'm much more of an observer, he's much more of a participant of things."

David Bowie, 1987

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 12:04 PM
Iggy discusses their differences new [re: ziggfried]  

"We're so opposite it works good...He's slick, I'm what I am...He's London, and I'm Detroit."

Iggy Pop, 1986

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 12:19 PM
Bowie & Iggy as lyricist new [re: ziggfried]  

"He's been a friend of mine since 1972. That goes without saying. He's one of my best friends, if not my best friend, but as a collaborator, I think I've really made him aware of the quality of his voice, which I believe he really wasn't aware of until he really started singing on Blah-Blah-Blah...Maybe I was able to let him realise that he didn't have to be quite so histrionic in what he was doing, physically or with sound, and still have the same kind of weight as a performer, as an artist, that he was, in fact, a brilliant lyricist. Fabulous lyrics, and he really should face the fact that he's a born poet, and musically, I was able to structure that in a way to make his lyrics really work for him...I think it was so unfair that he was receiving so little attention, when there are so many bands out there that owe him so much, from the Pistols onwards."

David Bowie, 1987

ziggfried
(acolyte)
05/05/04 12:32 PM
Iggy on Bowie, again new [re: ziggfried]  

"He sees me with a distance I don't see for myself. He sees me as a character. Probably as an American beatnik who survived...Probably Kerouac thirty years later. And I think I see him as one of the only representatives of the enfranchised world that can understand me, or that I can stand. He's a realist from a very sophisticated urban setting who, when I met him in 1970, he already had his plan for media domination, or whatever, whereas I'm sort of an inspired idealist from the midwest, who has made every mistake in the book. I just sort of follow my nose...I'm happy if I can create a good song."

Iggy Pop, 1987

white rabbit
(acolyte)
06/26/04 11:30 PM
A bitch magnet? new [re: ziggfried]  

Were he and Bowie ever lovers, as is often assumed?

“Well, I’ve never had any sort of macho revulsion of fags, but Bowie and I – never, never, never, never. Everybody would think that, but I never saw him be that way anyway. I’ll tell you this. That guy got more p-u-s-s-y. I couldn’t believe it. Talk about a bitch magnet. Damn! Actresses, heiresses, waitresses, skateresses. And me? I was just left holding my dick most of the time. I had this short haircut, and I looked like a duck. But I got lucky sometimes. I got a good song out of a girl I was knocking off at the time, and it became ‘China Girl.’ “


Hedegaard, E. (Dec. 11, 2003). Iggy Pop's trail of destruction. Rolling Stone, issue 937, p. 80.


ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/03/04 10:14 PM
Iggy & Krafty new [re: ziggfried]  

"David Bowie turned me on to [Kraftwerk’s Radio-Activity] when I was hanging out with him on his Station to Station tour, trying to get him to produce The Idiot. I heard this and thought, 'Aha--the world has changed.'"

Iggy Pop, Spin Magazine, November 2003

ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/03/04 10:17 PM
Pop & Bop new [re: ziggfried]  

"Bowie played [The Ramones] for me in a car, on our way to defend ourselves against a bogus drug rap. He always had whatever was new. I remember thinking 'Blitzkrieg Bop' sounded vaguely dangerous."

Iggy Pop, Spin Magazine, November 2003

globule2
(crash course raver)
09/06/04 09:12 PM
Re: Pop & Bop new [re: ziggfried]  

That car ride was immediatedely following the famous Nassau County Coliseum show in 1976 and they arrived in Rochester, NY at around 4AM the next morning.



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:22 AM
He screams and he bawls new [re: ziggfried]  

“[The Jean Genie was] focused around Iggy, an Iggy-type character to be fully fair. It wasn’t actually Iggy…”

David Bowie (1996), cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.110



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:24 AM
Isn't it wild... new [re: ziggfried]  

“Bowie and I really just brought out the best in each other. ‘Nightclubbing’ was my comment on what it was like hanging out with him every night.”

Iggy Pop, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.153



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:26 AM
Dum Dum Dave new [re: ziggfried]  

“When David plays guitar he gets nuts…You know that little part on ‘Dum Dum Boys’, that ‘Boweeewaaaah’? That’s his part, that’s David doing that. He struggles with that thing when he plays!”

Iggy Pop, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.68



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:28 AM
Dum Dum Dave Redux new [re: ziggfried]  

“I only had a few notes on the piano, I couldn’t quite finish the tune…Bowie said, ‘Don’t you think we could make a song with that? Why don’t you tell the story of the Stooges? He gave me the concept of the song and he also gave me the title…Then he added that guitar arpeggio that metal groups love today. He played it, and then he asked Phil Palmer to play the tune again because he didn’t find his playing technically proficient enough.”

Iggy Pop, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.68

ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:30 AM
Iggy assesses The Idiot new [re: ziggfried]  

“[Bowie] was my last ditch…We didn’t have a band, there was just the two of us on that whole album, like a couple of old ladies with knitting needles or something. David plays better Angry Young Guitar than any Angry Young Guitar Player I’ve ever heard, including [Stooges player] James Williamson.”

Iggy Pop, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.383

ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:41 AM
Here comes my chinese rug... new [re: ziggfried]  

“[Bowie] wanted me to sing [‘Success’] like a crooner…and I thought it was completely horrible. So I waited until he walked out of the studio and I changed everything. When he came back, he found it very good.”

Iggy Pop (1997), cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.207



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:44 AM
Iggy's competitiveness new [re: ziggfried]  

“During [the Lust For Life sessions], the band and Bowie’d leave the studio and go to sleep, but not me. I was working to be one step ahead of them for the next day…See, Bowie’s a hell of a fast guy. Very quick thinker, quick action, very active person, very sharp. I realized I had to be quicker than him, otherwise whose album was it gonna be?”

Iggy Pop, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.383



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:47 AM
Bowie comes clean about raping "Tonight" new [re: ziggfried]  

“[The prologue of the original ‘Tonight’] was such an idiosyncratic thing of Jimmy’s that it seemed not part of my vocabulary…There was that consideration, and I was doing it with Tina [Turner] – she’s the other voice on it – and I didn’t want to inflict it on her either. It’s not necessarily something she would particularly agree to sing or be a part of. I guess we changed the whole sentiment around. It still has that same barren feeling though, but it’s out of that specific area that I’m not at home in. I can’t say that it’s Iggy’s world, but it’s far more of Iggy’s observation than mine.”

David Bowie (1984), cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.220



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:49 AM
Borneo! new [re: ziggfried]  

“I think it works out around fifty-fifty lyrics on most of the songs, but Jimmy’s work stands out most obviously on ‘Tumble and Twirl’, I think that’s obviously his line of humour. The lines about the T-shirts and the part about the sewage floating down the hill…”

David Bowie (1984), cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.221



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/25/04 04:51 AM
Foretelling NLMD! new [re: ziggfried]  

“There’s a particular sound I’m after that I haven’t really got yet and I probably won’t drop this search until I get it…I’ll either crack it on the next album or just retire on it. I think I got quite close to it on ‘Dancing With The Big Boys’…That was quite an adventurous bit of writing in the sense that we didn’t look for any standards. I got very musical over the last couple of years; I stayed away from experimentation…but in ‘Big Boys’ Iggy and I just broke away from all that for the one track. That came nearer to the sound I was looking for more than anything. I’d like to try maybe one more set of pieces like that.”

David Bowie (1984), cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.59



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/26/04 11:07 AM
Will they or won't they...? new [re: ziggfried]  

“I have no plans [to work with Bowie again]. Never plan. Just do it.”

Iggy Pop, 4 June 1997



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/27/04 09:10 AM
And I thought Street Theatre was crap... new [re: ziggfried]  

“Iggy has natural theatre. It’s very interesting because it doesn’t conform to any standards or rules or structure of theatre. It’s his own and it’s just a Detroit theatre that he’s brought with him. It’s straight from the street.”

David Bowie, NME, 22 July 1972



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/28/04 08:46 AM
Hmmm, I must have missed this movie... new [re: ziggfried]  

“I’ve done nine screenplays over the past year. I spend so much time on the damn road, so I write films. I’ll probably do the one I wrote for myself, Iggy Pop and Joan Stanton. I haven’t got a title yet and I don’t one to go into the story, but it’s very violent and depressing, and it’ll probably bomb miserably. I want to make it in black and white, to boot. I like films made before the ’30s – they seemed to have a lot more genuine expression.”

David Bowie, NME, 23 August 1975



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/28/04 12:11 PM
Funtime's Over new [re: ziggfried]  

"I don't see Iggy at all. I've not seen him since '97. We were working on a tour in Germany. He seemed fine. I think he does far, far more touring than I do. I like touring, but I don't like it quite so obsessively as [he does]. We have drifted away from each other, and in a way I understand why. I've never talked to him about this...

I think there was a moment where Jim decided that he couldn't do a fucking article without my name being mentioned, and I don't think that's a very comfortable feeling. I completely understand -- I really, really do. Unfortunately, I think Jim took it personally, and that's a shame because I would have liked to remain closer to him.

I think that he felt he had to physically take himself out of the picture to become autonomous again. We've never voiced this to each other, because we're sensitive to each others' feelings. I'm not saying that it's a resentment, but I do believe that he always felt that there was this svengali-type figure dogging him. Because I did such a load of work with him and I was a major mainstream artist myself at the time."

David Bowie, Gettingit.com, 5 October 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
10/26/04 11:13 AM
All aboard for Friendtime new [re: ziggfried]  

"Bowie didn't have an influence on me other than friendship...Friendship's an underrated influence in these modern times. Basically, David and I exchanged information. It's great to meet somebody else who thinks they're always right."

Iggy Pop (1986), cited in Uncut #70 (March 2003), p.58



EuropeanCanon
(crash course raver)
10/31/04 06:56 AM
Dave on Jim new [re: ziggfried]  

He [Bowie] retreated to Berlin and shacked up with the equally mental Iggy Pop.

"I started making friends for the first time. I know it sounds strange but I didn't have many people to pit myself against and say, 'My life's not like theirs'. I didn't know anybody, I really didn't. I mean, Iggy was one of the few people that I sort of knew. We are still very cordial with each other but we have this certain wariness of each other - there was only a tenuous link between us at the best of times. I can't ever say we were bosom buddies..."

NME, 25 November 1995, p. 30.

ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/04/04 10:26 AM
Foreshadowing "Blah-Blah-Blah" new [re: ziggfried]  

"What I suppose I really wanted to do was to work with Iggy again, that's something I've not done for a long time. And Iggy wanted us to do something together. We're ultimately leading up, I hope, to me doing his next album. We've been talking about it for a year or so and we've got him off the road. He's not on the road now and he won't be going back on the road for a while."

David Bowie, NME, 29 September 1984



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/04/04 10:27 AM
Origin of Big Boys new [re: ziggfried]  

"I really got into that: trying to write musically and develop things the way people used to write in the '50s, but in “Big Boys” Iggy and I just broke away from all of that for the one track. That came nearer to the sound I was looking for than anything. I'd like to try maybe one more set of pieces like that. Whenever anyone asks me what the next album is going to be like, I invariably reply 'protest' because I have as little idea as anybody what comes next.”

David Bowie, NME, 29 September 1984



ziggfried
(acolyte)
11/04/04 10:29 AM
See? NLMD was ADVENTUROUS! new [re: ziggfried]  

"The interesting thing about rock is that you never think that it's going to go on for much longer. Then when you find that it has...I'm 37 going on 38 and I find myself thinking, 'I'm still doing it!" So you're re-defining it all the time. The whole animal of rock keeps changing itself so fast and so furiously that you just can't plan ahead. I've got absolutely no idea. I've got two or three anchors: to do some more work with Iggy and to try and write something for myself that is extraordinary and adventurous. Those are the only things in music that I know I'll be doing in the future..."

David Bowie, NME, 29 September 1984



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/29/05 01:58 PM
Soldiering on new [re: ziggfried]  

"I don't think there were blows [between Bowie and James Williamson during the recording of Soldier]. There was a lot of tension around that session. Bowie's visit played a good part actually. Williamson, who had begun production on that record, had gone a little overboard and was trying to harness absurd advanced technology. I wanted to make a punk record. He was trying to hook up the 24 track tape machines to make a 48 track capability in the Welsh countryside in 1979. I was sort of a hair-trigger and impatient musician then -- ready, and dying to record. There was really no need for applied technology at that point, except to glorify a production career that he had in mind for himself basically. And into this came Bowie, who showed up at one session, drove a considerable way to get there, and wanted to get involved. He gets bored a lot and likes to butt-in to all sorts of situations -- a true English rock star. You find him turning up here and there, wherever he thinks the salient point is,at that point, in rock history. I guess he thought he should come out and he came out and he contributed to a really good cut. Unfortunately for Williamson, it also contributed to our rift, and Pat Moran ended up doing the record. I was, uh, unsound at the time. I've been unsound for about half of my career, which is the bad news. The good news is that I've now been sound for more years than I was unsound."

Iggy Pop, Mean Magazine #14, September 1981



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/31/05 09:37 PM
Rocky Jim new [re: ziggfried]  

"Jim hadn't worked for at least 2 years, had been through some very bad times, and needed more than a little bit of support emotionally and mentally as well as materially and I think he resolved most of his problems on the first album [The Idiot], and if it shows at all my influence or attributes won't be quite as recognisable in any future stuff that we're doing and we're doing another album after this. Jim is very much in charge of his own situation and he realises what he wants to write and what he wants to write about. He's becoming an excellent song writer but he had that lapse and that peaking thing...he's fantastic. I've always thought he was for me, rock and roll, absolute rock and roll, uncompromising rock and roll."

David Bowie, Zigzag, January 1978



ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/31/05 09:39 PM
Piano Dude new [re: ziggfried]  

"[Iggy] encouraged me to play piano with him [on the first 1977 tour] and I thought the idea was thoroughly enticing and very tempting and I did it for the nerve of it really. I never enjoyed a tour so much, because I had no responsibilities on my shoulders at all, I mean I just had to sit there, drink a bit, have a cigarette, wink at the band, I mean ya know, and watch him."

David Bowie, Zigzag, January 1978




ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/31/05 09:41 PM
Jimmy new [re: ziggfried]  

"I really want Jimmy to regain his old audience and find an even bigger, newer one because I've always considered him very important."

David Bowie, Zigzag, January 1978



ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/13/05 01:55 PM
Don't Believe The Truth new [re: ziggfried]  

"[People are fascinated with me] because I'm the guy that slept with David Bowie. [When asked whether that was true] No, never. But people think what they want, you can beat the truth into them and they still don't want to know."

Iggy Pop, LAUNCH, 6 July 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
09/03/05 12:51 PM
Wall The Young Dudes new [re: ziggfried]  

"Iggy Pop and I were a couple of very naughty boys, who went to Berlin to learn how to be good...I remember one morning, after a particularly mischievous night out, we both met up at a coffee bar we used to frequent and discussed the doings of the night before, and Iggy - or Jim - related most extraordinary events. He said that he'd been to a punk club...It was the anniversary of the building of the Wall, that you must remember, and he went to a punk club that was holding an anniversary party and they built an entirely accurate replica of the Berlin Wall, and at the stroke of midnight, fifty savage, demented punks leapt on this wall and tore it to pieces with their mouths and teeth and fists...but he said that it was the aftermath that was the most affecting, because after all this had happened - they demolished the wall - there were small groups of them, standing around the corners, pitifully crying, tears streaming down their faces. And I thought that was an incredibly moving thing, and a real memory of Berlin - the Berlin that I knew at the time, anyway. ["China Girl"] is a song I wrote with Jim at around that time...And I guess that [it] is also sort of about invasion and exploitation."

David Bowie, VH-1 Storytellers, recorded 13 August 1999, broadcast 18 October 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
12/21/05 08:38 PM
Fishtime new [re: ziggfried]  

“We don’t go fishing, if that’s what you’re asking. But we have a lot of mutual respect for one another.”

Iggy Pop, The West Australian, 22 December 2005



ziggfried
(acolyte)
12/25/05 09:49 PM
Bowie on that remix... new [re: ziggfried]  

“Iggy…had been dumped in some kind of backwater. Since his extraordinary ‘peanut-butter’ performance at a festival gig in the States [the Cincinnati Pop Festival, 13 June 1970] he had slipped from view, even there, and was in need of a new and fresh-hearted crowd. I pushed hard at [Tony] DeFries to also secure for Jim a gig in London during that same month [July 1972], again with an eye to making an album that would open up more European avenues for him. Although I helped on the Raw Power mix (the version I still prefer over the later remix – it has more wound-up ferocity and chaos and, in my humble opinion, is a hallmark roots sound for what was later to become Punk) we weren’t to get a full run recording together until 1976 with The Idiot.”

David Bowie, Moonage Daydream (2002), p. 61 (2005 ed).



ziggfried
(acolyte)
01/05/06 11:49 AM
Iggy & O'Boogie new [re: ziggfried]  

"I met John [Lennon] in Hong Kong in 1977. He was travelling with Sean, who was about two years old, and was on his way to meet Yoko in Japan. I was with David Bowie and Coco Schwab, his friend and PA, on our way back to Europe from Japan, after a rock tour of my stuff...A pair of elevator doors opened, and he stood in the hotel foyer, wearing a basketball jersey that was way too big, and he gave David a very big hug and a kind of laughing, greeting smile. I was surprised to see an English industry giant exhibit such warmth. Also to see him in a basketball jersey was super-cool (pardon my fandom).

We went to dinner a couple of times, the four of us, after Sean was in bed for the night. Also to a topless bar once, and once to tea at a snooty country club. He really knew how to sound off when he wanted to, and at each of the latter two destinations he rose to his feet to half-yell, half-chortle: "Have you ever heard of The Beatles?" when service was not forthcoming. I think he enjoyed this. I know I did."

Iggy Pop, Memories of John Lennon (2005)



ziggfried
(acolyte)
01/27/06 06:13 AM
Classic Iggy new [re: ziggfried]  

"If you haven't written a memorable song by the time you're 30, you ain't gonna. I had written about 10 or 12, or co-written them by the time I was 30, half between these guys [the Stooges] and the Raw Power band, and half with Bowie. If I hadn't done what I had done with the Stooges, Bowie wouldn't have been motivated to do what we did. The proof wouldn't have been there."

Iggy Pop, The Australian, 26 January 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
01/29/06 04:01 AM
Iggy & Democracy new [re: ziggfried]  

“Bowie and I are still firm friends, but we are both obviously very busy. If he came to me offering to do the next Stooges album or write us a song, I’d have to check it out with the rest of the band. I just get a vote like the other guys.”

Iggy Pop, The Sunday Times Magazine, 29 January 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/21/06 11:53 PM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

"[New Values, 1979] is clean and carefully done. There's a lot of quality and when it came out, there were two streams that were really going strong in popular, contemporary music -- mostly coming out of England -- and one was the sort of post-punk experimental thing: lots of air, lots of eclecticism, typified by Eno, Bowie, Talking Heads. It was mid-Atlantic, it was a Euro-centric way of looking at things and New Wave was about to come in. [New Values] didn't really fit with that. And then there was the intoxication of good old snarling punk and it didn't really fit in with that because it was almost quietly done, precisely done. There were no tricks on it. It's a very particular sound on the record. A couple of people told me it's held up well."

Iggy Pop, Mean Magazine #14, September 2001



ziggfried
(acolyte)
03/21/06 11:59 PM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

"David Bowie [still calls me Jim], when he calls every two or three years. All the members of the Stooges. People I’ve known a long time, or smart alecks. Guys with really safe, Anglicized names like Jeremy get bugged by the idea that you can make up a goofy name like Iggy Pop and make it stick."

Iggy Pop, Blender, September 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
04/09/06 07:32 AM
Re: new [re: ziggfried]  

"It's funny, y'know, after all these years, cuz I always had that background with the 'serious' art world where it's like, "Oh, Iggy Pop, oh shit, no..." It sorta went from, "Don't let him in your house, he'll steal your stuff." Then it stepped up to, "He's silly." Then it was like, "He's crazy." Then it went up to like, "Well... it's not really art, is it?" Now, it's finally like, "Oh, okay, this stuff is ok"... many years ago there was something called The South Bank Show in England. Very prestigious...and in the '70s when I was living there with Bowie and every week we'd see they'd do a show on some major guy, y'know, like from Al Pacino to Noam Chomsky kinda thing. And Bowie kept saying, "They should do one on you," and "Nobody ever covers us, and na na na..." So that was always a big thing...and finally, like thirty years later they came around and did a thing on me..."

Iggy Pop, TRIP magazine, 5 April 2006



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/14/07 06:57 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

"Unfortunately [I taught Iggy Pop to ski]. We thought, "Ooh, let's do healthy things." My son started me off skiing, because ever since he was five or six he's been an avid skier - most kids who grow up in Switzerland in the mountains are - and I felt a bit left out, so I started learning and I enjoyed it a lot and I knew Jim - Iggy - would too because Jim is incredibly athletic. So we used to go up in the mountains and I taught him to ski. He's a very good skier...He has an interesting style: lots of bravado and no fear."

David Bowie, Smash Hits, June 1987



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/14/07 07:13 AM
Re: Isn't it wild... new [re: ziggfried]  

"We had the idea [for "Nightclubbing"] on the last day of recording...The musicians had all packed everything away, some of them had already left on the plane. Coco Schwab came in armed with two ugly plastic masks. Bowie put one on for a laugh and sat down at the piano and played some old Hoagy Carmichael stuff. I went in and told him, 'That's it, that's exactly what I want.' I wrote the lyric in ten minutes and we recorded the song with a lousy drum machine. Bowie kept on saying, 'But we gotta get back the drummer, you're not gonna have that freaky sound on the tape!' And I replied, 'Hey, no way, it kicks ass, it's better than a drummer.' I always encouraged him to express the darkest and most deranged part of his art. Bowie helped me with some of the lyrics and said, 'Why don't you write a description of walking through the night like ghosts?'"

Iggy Pop, cited in The Complete David Bowie (2004 edition), p.153



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/15/07 04:42 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

“The whole reason for going [to Berlin] was because it was so low-key. Jim [Iggy Pop] and I - we were both having the same problems - knew it was the kind of place where you walk around and really are left alone and not stopped by people. They're very blasé there. Cynical, irony-based people and it's a great place if you really want to try and do some soul-searching and find out what it is you really want.”

David Bowie, Q magazine, June 1989



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/18/07 02:25 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

Describe the night you first saw and heard Iggy Pop.

"I remember his bottom more than anything else. I saw him only from the back as I was playing piano for him. This was around 1976, I suppose. I'd never seen him on-stage up until then, I knew him and loved his records and had brought him to England to play in 1973 but had missed those gigs because I was working. I couldn't get over his energy and commitment to savage realism. It was just not the same Jim that I knew, though. A rather lonely and quiet guy with a drug problem, horn-rimmed glasses and huge appetite for reading. When he was straight he was one of the sweetest guys you wish to be and talk with. But when stoned, oh, what a mess. Well, we both were. Can't help but respect what he's done, though. Not sure about this Charles Bukowski direction he's taken over the last few years. It's not defying expectations. It's playing to the gallery. I think he's got far greater potential than he allows himself. He just needs nudging in the right direction."

David Bowie, Mojo, July 2002



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/19/07 07:58 AM
Re: Iggy Pop [re: ziggfried]  

"[The success of Let's Dance] slowed everything down, it really did. Up until that point I'd done one, maybe two [albums]; sometimes if I was producing an artist it would be three albums I was making a year. With Iggy, for instance I was writing three albums a year for that period. I was writing his Lust For Life and The Idiot, and then I had my own albums I was writing. I was also doing the odd other thing for another artist as well, so it was really a heavy workload. But I enjoyed the hell out of it. And I was touring at the same time."

David Bowie, Weekly Dig, December 2003



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/19/07 09:02 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

"I did have two or three fabulous, wonderful friends [in the late 70s]...but the loneliness was within me. Coco [Schwab] was always a great support, and I was very close to Iggy as well, so the three of us bonded as a team. And yeah, some wonderful work came out of it. But within myself I was a very lonely person. It wasn't a pleasant neighbourhood in my head. I was in a kind of recovery, yet I didn't know it. I'd really badly fucked myself up, and it took quite a few years to realise the extent of the damage to my emotional self. I was really cracked-up and broken, y'know."

David Bowie, Uncut magazine, October 1999



ziggfried
(acolyte)
02/22/07 10:05 PM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

"Bowie and I met up at a TV show recently...Bowie clapped me on the shoulder and asked me if I was still alive. He is still an arsehole, but a damned nice one."

Iggy Pop, Salon.com, 28 June 2001



EuropeanCanon
(crash course raver)
03/25/07 09:17 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

For a while back in the 1970s, James Osterberg's manic alter ego completely hypnotised David Bowie. He named his most famous creation Ziggy Stardust after him, and shifted the register of his singing lower in a bid to match Iggy's growling baritone. According to Bowie's guitarist Mick Ronson, "David wanted to be Iggy." When he was at his lowest point in 1975, sleeping in a Hollywood garage on a stolen mattress, being supported by a gay hustler called Bruce, Bowie spirited him away to Berlin to produce what are undoubtedly his two best albums, The Idiot and Lust for Life. In response, Iggy used to refer to his benefactor as "that f***in' carrot top" and now doesn't mention him at all. "Everybody wants to be Iggy" is all he says when the subject of Bowie's adoration comes up.

Robert Sandall, reviewing 'Open Up and Bleed: The Biography of Iggy Pop' by Paul Trynka.
The Sunday Times, Culture, March 25, 2007.


ziggfried
(acolyte)
08/30/07 05:37 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

"There are no friends in showbusiness. David Bowie once told me that and he was probably right. Do I still talk to Bowie? Only occasionally, but it's very cordial."

Iggy Pop, the NME, 18 August 2007



globule2
(cracked actor)
06/17/09 10:38 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

exerpt from June 9, 2009 article in The (Montreal) Gazette, written by Bernard Peruse:

In reply to:

Pop said Bowie's friendship made him "more generous to others, more compassionate to others later in my life, because somebody gave me a couple of good breaks at a key time in my own life."

If Pop went to musical college by performing with his pre-Stooges blues band the Prime Movers, his grad work, he said, was with Bowie.

"I picked up a lot of information during these years that I still reference and use - everything from how huge industry giants act at dinner to the difference between a Bordeaux and a bone," he said, laughing.

And yet there was a price for Bowie's involvement, Pop said. Asked to elaborate, he said it was about carrying his weight and paying back as an artist. "It wasn't like somebody was just going to give me something altruistically," he said. "There was the same artistic pressure that you have with any strong collaborator - to measure up. Or else," he said, chuckling.




ziggfried
(acolyte)
07/09/09 04:30 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: globule2]  

"Let's do a little Iggy/Bowie medley, shall we?...Here's one I wrote with the old cunt, it's called "Mass Production"..."

Iggy Pop, live at the Seaview Ballroom, Melbourne, 3 July 1983



EuropeanCanon
(cracked actor)
04/18/10 07:04 AM
Re: Iggy Pop new [re: ziggfried]  

Our time is almost up. Is he still pals with Bowie? “No.” When did he last see him? “I can’t remember. I spoke with him on the phone about seven years ago, he got my number and we caught up, had a very cordial, nice conversation. He’s living a certain life, I’m living a certain life, there’s not a cross there right now.”

Iggy Pop at 62, Times Online, 17 April 2010. Interview by Robert Crampton




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